Research Topic

Optimizing Probiotic Applications in Agriculture: Exploring the Role of Growth and Health Promoter's Microorganisms in Plants and Livestock Animals

About this Research Topic

The model of agricultural production currently used and the growing demand for livestock products won’t be able to sustain the expected world population growth. Moreover, a large part of agricultural and animal food production is intensive, conflicting with the public demand for increased environmental sustainability and more ethical production. The need for environment protection and food quality maintenance are among the biggest challenges of this century. Probiotics are known as beneficial microbes, conferring health benefits to the host whether it is a plant or an animal. Plant Growth Promoting Microorganisms (PGPMs) improve plant’s growth and health by phytohormones production, nutrients mobilization and systemic resistance induction. PGPMs are commonly applied as biofertilizers and additives to crops, supporting a sustainable agriculture. Supplementation with in-feed-probiotics has been largely exploited in the livestock sector for a sustainable food-animal production. Probiotics can modulate gut microbiota, stimulate gut immune system and protect animals from pathogens.

PGPMs inoculation for plant health improvement have been largely explored, however there is still a need for advanced comprehensive research on the effects of probiotics' synergic effect, both from the molecular and physiological point of view. In addition, further studies on their effects on plant microbiota (including symbiotic microorganisms and endophytes) should be expected.

Furthermore, in livestock animals, despite the extensive work already carried out, conflicting results and little or no benefits conferred by probiotic have been shown. In addition, no clear elucidations on the biological mechanisms at the basis of the probiotic beneficial effects on animal health have been provided.

Considering the potential of probiotics for improving plant and animal health, this Research Topic would benefit from a multidisciplinary approach involving microbiology, animal and plant science to promote a more sustainable agricultural production in the view of the One Health approach.

Furthermore, the molecular and physiological interactions established between probiotics and superior organisms is a highly suitable model for the application of a system biology study approach.

This Research Topic welcome Original Researches, Methods, Reviews and Mini Reviews that provide
new insights covering, but not limited to, the following sub-topics:

- Identification and characterization of beneficial bacterial strains for their application in plant and livestock

- Characterization of PGPMs and their in-planta effects, taking into account the induced physiological effects in plant growth and development, and the effect of probiotics inoculation on plant microbiota

- Description of functions and mechanisms of probiotics in the modulation of gut microbiota and health of livestock


Keywords: Probiotic, Plant Growth Promoting Microorganisms, Livestock, Sustainability


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The model of agricultural production currently used and the growing demand for livestock products won’t be able to sustain the expected world population growth. Moreover, a large part of agricultural and animal food production is intensive, conflicting with the public demand for increased environmental sustainability and more ethical production. The need for environment protection and food quality maintenance are among the biggest challenges of this century. Probiotics are known as beneficial microbes, conferring health benefits to the host whether it is a plant or an animal. Plant Growth Promoting Microorganisms (PGPMs) improve plant’s growth and health by phytohormones production, nutrients mobilization and systemic resistance induction. PGPMs are commonly applied as biofertilizers and additives to crops, supporting a sustainable agriculture. Supplementation with in-feed-probiotics has been largely exploited in the livestock sector for a sustainable food-animal production. Probiotics can modulate gut microbiota, stimulate gut immune system and protect animals from pathogens.

PGPMs inoculation for plant health improvement have been largely explored, however there is still a need for advanced comprehensive research on the effects of probiotics' synergic effect, both from the molecular and physiological point of view. In addition, further studies on their effects on plant microbiota (including symbiotic microorganisms and endophytes) should be expected.

Furthermore, in livestock animals, despite the extensive work already carried out, conflicting results and little or no benefits conferred by probiotic have been shown. In addition, no clear elucidations on the biological mechanisms at the basis of the probiotic beneficial effects on animal health have been provided.

Considering the potential of probiotics for improving plant and animal health, this Research Topic would benefit from a multidisciplinary approach involving microbiology, animal and plant science to promote a more sustainable agricultural production in the view of the One Health approach.

Furthermore, the molecular and physiological interactions established between probiotics and superior organisms is a highly suitable model for the application of a system biology study approach.

This Research Topic welcome Original Researches, Methods, Reviews and Mini Reviews that provide
new insights covering, but not limited to, the following sub-topics:

- Identification and characterization of beneficial bacterial strains for their application in plant and livestock

- Characterization of PGPMs and their in-planta effects, taking into account the induced physiological effects in plant growth and development, and the effect of probiotics inoculation on plant microbiota

- Description of functions and mechanisms of probiotics in the modulation of gut microbiota and health of livestock


Keywords: Probiotic, Plant Growth Promoting Microorganisms, Livestock, Sustainability


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

18 June 2021 Abstract
10 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

18 June 2021 Abstract
10 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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