Research Topic

Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC): Its Mechanisms, technological, economic, and environmental impacts

About this Research Topic

Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is an electrochemical corrosion process that is not yet fully understood. One of the reasons for ambiguities about MIC is the involvement of communities of micro-/macro-organisms which can drastically change in time, space, types, and number. The ability of biological organisms to adapt to the environmental adversities means that MIC can never be considered fully under control. All engineering materials (metals and non-metals) exposed to natural environments can be affected by MIC except for, possibly, titanium alloys. In recent years, mechanistic studies on MIC have put greater emphasis on electron exchange promoted by bacteria than on the chemistry involved (i.e., Electrical MIC (EMIC) vs. Chemical MIC (CMIC)). A multitude of microorganisms have been demonstrated to be actively involved in corrosion, as well as, in some cases, its inhibition. All over the world, the cost of MIC damage can reach up to 40% of the total cost of corrosion (GDP units), and when the countermeasures are included, the costs in terms of economic and ecologic impacts could be much greater.

The goals of this Research Topic are to provide:

1. An update of the understanding of the mechanisms involved in microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metals;
2. An update of the understanding of the mechanisms involved in microbiologically influenced deterioration (MID) for non-metals such as various polymers like, but not limited to, high density polyethylene (HDPE) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) when exposed to MID-inducing bacteria;
3. An update of the understanding of the mechanisms involved in microbiologically influenced corrosion inhibition (MICI) for metal alloys;
4. Tools for MIC/MID identification and monitoring;
5. Detailed interpretations of failure cases where MIC could be the main cause of premature failure in terms of the root cause analysis and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA);
6. An assessment of the economic and environmental impacts of MIC failures on the basis of modelling/interpretation.

The Special Issue welcomes contributions focusing on, but not limited to:

• Applied and pure research on biofilm formation and the role of external electron transfer as related to MIC/MID mechanisms and enhanced corrosion;
• The mechanisms involved in decelerating corrosion by bacteria involved in MIC (for example, iron-reducing bacteria);
• Case histories related to Bacteria-induced MIC/MID of various equipment and materials (metallic /non-metallic);
• Case histories related to Archaea-induced MIC/MID of various equipment and materials (metallic /non-metallic);
• MIC/MID monitoring on-line and off-line;
• Advanced mathematical modelling of MIC/MID reactions and biofilm formation;
• Modelling of environmental and economic impacts of MIC/MID;
• Use of green and natural (e.g., plant extracts) as alternatives to synthetic biocides; and
• Next generation, smart, eco-friendly coatings as antimicrobial coatings.

Topic Editor Reza Javaherdashti is the current General Manager at Eninco B.V., (The Netherlands)
Supervisor to the project of Anti-microbial coating
Head of Nanobiomining Project


Keywords: Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion, MIC, Electrical MIC(EMIC), Chemical MIC(CMIC), Microbiologically Influenced Deterioration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is an electrochemical corrosion process that is not yet fully understood. One of the reasons for ambiguities about MIC is the involvement of communities of micro-/macro-organisms which can drastically change in time, space, types, and number. The ability of biological organisms to adapt to the environmental adversities means that MIC can never be considered fully under control. All engineering materials (metals and non-metals) exposed to natural environments can be affected by MIC except for, possibly, titanium alloys. In recent years, mechanistic studies on MIC have put greater emphasis on electron exchange promoted by bacteria than on the chemistry involved (i.e., Electrical MIC (EMIC) vs. Chemical MIC (CMIC)). A multitude of microorganisms have been demonstrated to be actively involved in corrosion, as well as, in some cases, its inhibition. All over the world, the cost of MIC damage can reach up to 40% of the total cost of corrosion (GDP units), and when the countermeasures are included, the costs in terms of economic and ecologic impacts could be much greater.

The goals of this Research Topic are to provide:

1. An update of the understanding of the mechanisms involved in microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metals;
2. An update of the understanding of the mechanisms involved in microbiologically influenced deterioration (MID) for non-metals such as various polymers like, but not limited to, high density polyethylene (HDPE) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) when exposed to MID-inducing bacteria;
3. An update of the understanding of the mechanisms involved in microbiologically influenced corrosion inhibition (MICI) for metal alloys;
4. Tools for MIC/MID identification and monitoring;
5. Detailed interpretations of failure cases where MIC could be the main cause of premature failure in terms of the root cause analysis and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA);
6. An assessment of the economic and environmental impacts of MIC failures on the basis of modelling/interpretation.

The Special Issue welcomes contributions focusing on, but not limited to:

• Applied and pure research on biofilm formation and the role of external electron transfer as related to MIC/MID mechanisms and enhanced corrosion;
• The mechanisms involved in decelerating corrosion by bacteria involved in MIC (for example, iron-reducing bacteria);
• Case histories related to Bacteria-induced MIC/MID of various equipment and materials (metallic /non-metallic);
• Case histories related to Archaea-induced MIC/MID of various equipment and materials (metallic /non-metallic);
• MIC/MID monitoring on-line and off-line;
• Advanced mathematical modelling of MIC/MID reactions and biofilm formation;
• Modelling of environmental and economic impacts of MIC/MID;
• Use of green and natural (e.g., plant extracts) as alternatives to synthetic biocides; and
• Next generation, smart, eco-friendly coatings as antimicrobial coatings.

Topic Editor Reza Javaherdashti is the current General Manager at Eninco B.V., (The Netherlands)
Supervisor to the project of Anti-microbial coating
Head of Nanobiomining Project


Keywords: Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion, MIC, Electrical MIC(EMIC), Chemical MIC(CMIC), Microbiologically Influenced Deterioration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
31 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
31 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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