Skip to main content

About this Research Topic

Submission closed.

Pelagos and benthos have been classically studied as distinct domains of the marine environment, but they are not independent and cannot be considered as separate units. Contrarily, many physical, chemical and biological processes bind the two domains, particularly in shallow environments and transitional ...

Pelagos and benthos have been classically studied as distinct domains of the marine environment, but they are not independent and cannot be considered as separate units. Contrarily, many physical, chemical and biological processes bind the two domains, particularly in shallow environments and transitional habitats, where benthic-pelagic coupling concur to maintain high rates of primary production and degradation. While primary producers compete for the same resources (light and nutrients), benthic filtrators are well adapted to efficiently filter bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton, dissolved organic matter, as well as pollutants from the water column. In fact, many pressures affect the status of such biodiverse environments, like eutrophication, chemical contamination, human-induced mechanical disturbance, increased sedimentation and sediment resuspension. Besides this, marine benthic primary producers (including microphytobenthos) and benthic invertebrates, provide an extensive range of ecosystem services and drive important processes such as nutrient cycling, sediment reworking, bio-irrigation and organic matter decomposition in coastal areas.

The goal of this Research Topic is to highlight recent research focusing on benthic-pelagic coupling in shallow marine and transitional waters. Both matter and energy flow between pelagos and benthos in both directions, involving exchanges of organic matter and nutrients but also energy transfer in food webs and the moving of different life stages of planktonic (including resting stages) and benthic organisms driven by seasonality. So, a deeper knowledge of the life cycles of meroplanktonic as well as merobenthic species represents an obligate prerequisite for the understanding of the ecosystem functioning in shallow areas. With the ultimate goal of sustainable management of marine natural resources, the whole picture of the processes and flows between pelagos and benthos is a key factor to be known in depth.

In this Research Topic, we welcome in-field and laboratory studies focused on particular aspects of the life cycles of pelagic and benthic species that contribute to the exchange of matter and energy between the two domains and maintain high production in coastal environments. With this perspective, manuscripts reporting new methods and approaches are very welcomed, as well as mini-reviews or opinions to shade light also on benthic-pelagic coupling applied to functions and services that marine ecosystems provide to society and economy of coastal areas.

Keywords: marine coastal environments, plankton, benthos, life cycle, resting stages, biological processes, ecosystem functioning, ecosystem services


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

Recent Articles

Loading..

Articles

Sort by:

Loading..

Authors

Loading..

views

total views views downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.