Research Topic

Edema in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction

About this Research Topic

The prevalence of symptomatic heart failure (HF), which is the most common reason for heart transplantation, will increase 46% from 2012 to 2030. Dilated cardiomyopathy, which is caused by genetic and other disorders, is characterized by progressive heart enlargement with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Symptomatic HFrEF is associated with pathologic accumulations of extracellular sodium and water leading to lung edema, pleural effusion and other types of edema. Thus, the development of edema defines the transition from pre-symptomatic to symptomatic heart failure (shortness of breath, dyspnea during exertion, etc.), which is critically important for patients, as it causes a marked decline in the quality of life, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Preventing or delaying the transition from pre-symptomatic to symptomatic HF should be a key strategy in HF management.

Edema is not routinely and objectively measured in current clinical practice. The ability to reliably assess such changes can help greatly to improve care for such patients by providing a means of monitoring and making required adjustments to treatment protocols, thus eventually leading to precision medicine in these cases.

The goal of the Research Topic is to present and evaluate the mechanisms underlining edema development and to discuss modalities that allow routine, and objective edema monitoring for diagnostic and treatment strategies to delay or prevent the progressive loss of heart function and the transition to symptomatic HFrEF and improve patient quality and duration of life.

We are interested in manuscripts that address:
• Diagnostic and management challenges of objective edema assessment and monitoring
• Role of the sympathetic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the natriuretic peptide system in development and modulation of edema
• Edema-targeted interventions and therapy including precision medicine and dietary approaches
• Role of biomarkers
• Translational animal models, pre-clinical studies, and clinical studies
• Lifestyle and quality of life

Original Research Articles, Methodology papers, Short communications and Reviews or meta-analyses are encouraged.


Keywords: Heart failure, Edema, Ventricular dysfunction, Management and Mechanisms, Quality of life


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The prevalence of symptomatic heart failure (HF), which is the most common reason for heart transplantation, will increase 46% from 2012 to 2030. Dilated cardiomyopathy, which is caused by genetic and other disorders, is characterized by progressive heart enlargement with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Symptomatic HFrEF is associated with pathologic accumulations of extracellular sodium and water leading to lung edema, pleural effusion and other types of edema. Thus, the development of edema defines the transition from pre-symptomatic to symptomatic heart failure (shortness of breath, dyspnea during exertion, etc.), which is critically important for patients, as it causes a marked decline in the quality of life, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Preventing or delaying the transition from pre-symptomatic to symptomatic HF should be a key strategy in HF management.

Edema is not routinely and objectively measured in current clinical practice. The ability to reliably assess such changes can help greatly to improve care for such patients by providing a means of monitoring and making required adjustments to treatment protocols, thus eventually leading to precision medicine in these cases.

The goal of the Research Topic is to present and evaluate the mechanisms underlining edema development and to discuss modalities that allow routine, and objective edema monitoring for diagnostic and treatment strategies to delay or prevent the progressive loss of heart function and the transition to symptomatic HFrEF and improve patient quality and duration of life.

We are interested in manuscripts that address:
• Diagnostic and management challenges of objective edema assessment and monitoring
• Role of the sympathetic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the natriuretic peptide system in development and modulation of edema
• Edema-targeted interventions and therapy including precision medicine and dietary approaches
• Role of biomarkers
• Translational animal models, pre-clinical studies, and clinical studies
• Lifestyle and quality of life

Original Research Articles, Methodology papers, Short communications and Reviews or meta-analyses are encouraged.


Keywords: Heart failure, Edema, Ventricular dysfunction, Management and Mechanisms, Quality of life


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2021 Abstract
31 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2021 Abstract
31 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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