Research Topic

The Role of Chemosensory Receptors in Blood Glucose Homeostasis

About this Research Topic

Taste and smell play major roles in nutrition by providing an appreciation of food quality and palatability before ingestion. While an adequate nutrition is necessary for survival, the satisfaction to consume tasty food can in many situations override caloric needs. Overnutrition mediated by the rewarding activation of specific taste and olfactory receptors could in the long-term lead to the development of obesity and diabetes, a growing health issue throughout the world.

Historically discovered to be expressed in specialized tissues, namely in taste cells within taste buds or in the olfactory bulb, chemosensory receptors have since then been observed to be expressed in a wide range of other tissues such as in the gut and in pancreatic islet endocrine cells. These receptors have been shown to be involved in the secretion of various hormones modulating satiety and regulating

Understanding the role of taste and olfactory receptor signaling in glucose homeostasis is of particular importance to further expand our knowledge of the various mechanisms regulating blood glucose levels under normal and diabetic conditions. The aim of this research topic is to provide the readers with a broad overview of current and noteworthy studies focusing on the role of chemosensation in blood glucose homeostasis.

This Research Topic welcomes articles in the form of Original Research, Review, and Mini Review on the following sub-topics:
- effects of oral and extra-oral taste chemosensation on hormone release;
- regulation of pancreatic islet hormone release by odorant molecules;
- taste and olfactory receptor signaling in pancreatic islets;
- influence of chemosensing in the gut on glucose homeostasis;
- influence of hyperglycaemia, nutritional status and obesity on extra-oral taste chemosensation, and ensuing implications on blood glucose homeostasis;
- secretion of satiety peptides via chemosensory signaling;
- the implication of sweet taste receptor mediated brain glucose sensing in the regulation of insulin and glucagon secretion.

COI: Dr. El Hadji Dioum is an employee of PepsiCo R&D Nutrition


Keywords: chemosensation, taste receptors, olfactory receptors, GPCR, diabetes, pancreatic islets, beta cell, insulin, blood glucose homeostasis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Taste and smell play major roles in nutrition by providing an appreciation of food quality and palatability before ingestion. While an adequate nutrition is necessary for survival, the satisfaction to consume tasty food can in many situations override caloric needs. Overnutrition mediated by the rewarding activation of specific taste and olfactory receptors could in the long-term lead to the development of obesity and diabetes, a growing health issue throughout the world.

Historically discovered to be expressed in specialized tissues, namely in taste cells within taste buds or in the olfactory bulb, chemosensory receptors have since then been observed to be expressed in a wide range of other tissues such as in the gut and in pancreatic islet endocrine cells. These receptors have been shown to be involved in the secretion of various hormones modulating satiety and regulating

Understanding the role of taste and olfactory receptor signaling in glucose homeostasis is of particular importance to further expand our knowledge of the various mechanisms regulating blood glucose levels under normal and diabetic conditions. The aim of this research topic is to provide the readers with a broad overview of current and noteworthy studies focusing on the role of chemosensation in blood glucose homeostasis.

This Research Topic welcomes articles in the form of Original Research, Review, and Mini Review on the following sub-topics:
- effects of oral and extra-oral taste chemosensation on hormone release;
- regulation of pancreatic islet hormone release by odorant molecules;
- taste and olfactory receptor signaling in pancreatic islets;
- influence of chemosensing in the gut on glucose homeostasis;
- influence of hyperglycaemia, nutritional status and obesity on extra-oral taste chemosensation, and ensuing implications on blood glucose homeostasis;
- secretion of satiety peptides via chemosensory signaling;
- the implication of sweet taste receptor mediated brain glucose sensing in the regulation of insulin and glucagon secretion.

COI: Dr. El Hadji Dioum is an employee of PepsiCo R&D Nutrition


Keywords: chemosensation, taste receptors, olfactory receptors, GPCR, diabetes, pancreatic islets, beta cell, insulin, blood glucose homeostasis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

26 November 2021 Abstract
25 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

26 November 2021 Abstract
25 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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