About this Research Topic

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The research topic “Emerging Swine Viruses”, was among the top 10 most highly cited Research Topics of the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science. As a result, a second edition of the topic will be released. As coeditors of the 1st Special Issue, we thank all the authors who supported this “Research Topic” ...

The research topic “Emerging Swine Viruses”, was among the top 10 most highly cited Research Topics of the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science. As a result, a second edition of the topic will be released. As coeditors of the 1st Special Issue, we thank all the authors who supported this “Research Topic” by sending the results of their work, as well as all the reviewers and the readers.
This second call finds us still in the middle of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, a clear example of an emerging zoonotic virus that has brought the scientific community together to achieve unprecedent results, such as the development in a record time of new vaccines as well as the release more than 530,000 papers related with COVID 19, either by peer-reviewed journals or, in preprints servers. Coronaviruses are well-known agents in swine medicine. The genetic plasticity of these viruses through mutation or recombination allowed the emergence of new swine pathogens such as the porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCoV) or the swine enteric coronaviruses (SeCoV) and variants such as swine acute diarrheic syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV). Is to be expected that as results of the studies applied to SARS-CoV2 accumulate, new approaches will emerge deepening our understanding of old and new pig coronaviruses. It should be remembered that when CoVs adapt to a new species (inter-species transmission) they expand within the new species (intra-species transmission) establishing a new reservoir where mutations and recombination may emerge.
Likewise, since the initial transmission of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus back into pigs, numerous reassortants of swine, avian and human strains have been identified in pigs in America, Europe and Asia. Pigs share the same virus subtypes and receptors for influenza viruses with humans. Close and daily contact of pigs with farm and slaughterhouse workers constitutes a risk of interspecies transmission and creates an ideal scenario for the emergence of potentially pandemic strains.
The above mentioned viruses and other emerging and re-emerging agents such as porcine circovirus type 3 and type 4 (PCV3 and PCV4), porcine sapovirus (PSaV), delta coronavirus, porcine parainfluenza 1 (PPIV-1), swine orthopneumovirus (SOV), or senecavirus A (SVA) that have been described regionally and worldwide continue to be the focus in this 2nd edition of “Emerging Swine Viruses ”.

Keywords: zoonotic virus, coronaviruses, Swine Viruses


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