About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 25 August 2022

Exosomes are small particles secreted by cells, ranging from 30 to 150nm in diameter. They can contain various biomolecules, including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Exosomes can be used as biomarkers of different pathophysiological conditions, and have been studied as potential vehicles for drug delivery. The aim of this research topic is to focus on their potential in tissue regeneration.
Tissue regeneration is the process of renewal and regrowth of damaged cells, resulting in a tissue with the same structure, function, and biological activities as before. Although some tissues have regenerative capabilities (the liver and skin), most tissues and organs are unable to regenerate themselves. Regenerative medicine focuses on methods to help regenerate these tissues.

To date, many studies have focused on transplanting tissue or pluripotent stem cells to promote wound healing. However, reprogramming cells in vivo is not efficient, reducing the clinical potential of these studies. Recently, there has been increased interest in using endogenous stem cells for repairing tissue damage. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been extremely popular, due to their differentiative potential, immunosuppressive effects, and relative ease of culture. It is thought that the paracrine activity of MSCs helps mediate these effects – indeed, there have been numerous in vivo studies demonstrating the therapeutic effects of MSC-derived exosomes. The potential of MSC-derived exosomes in promoting tissue regeneration has gathered great interest, and is an exciting avenue for further research.
This research topic aims to consolidate the current advancements made in understanding MSC-derived exosomes. Current insights into their mechanisms of action, therapeutic potential, and methods in altering their properties are welcome.

- How do exosomes interact with residential cells?
- What molecular/cellular mechanisms are behind exosome-promoted tissue regeneration?
- What is the functional difference between exosomes from different stem cells?
- What modifications can be made to exosomes to enhance their therapeutic potential?
- What methods are there for enhancing exosomes’ biological function in tissue regeneration (for example, how can different biomolecules be loaded into exosomes)?

Keywords: exosome, stem cell, tissue regeneration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Exosomes are small particles secreted by cells, ranging from 30 to 150nm in diameter. They can contain various biomolecules, including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Exosomes can be used as biomarkers of different pathophysiological conditions, and have been studied as potential vehicles for drug delivery. The aim of this research topic is to focus on their potential in tissue regeneration.
Tissue regeneration is the process of renewal and regrowth of damaged cells, resulting in a tissue with the same structure, function, and biological activities as before. Although some tissues have regenerative capabilities (the liver and skin), most tissues and organs are unable to regenerate themselves. Regenerative medicine focuses on methods to help regenerate these tissues.

To date, many studies have focused on transplanting tissue or pluripotent stem cells to promote wound healing. However, reprogramming cells in vivo is not efficient, reducing the clinical potential of these studies. Recently, there has been increased interest in using endogenous stem cells for repairing tissue damage. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been extremely popular, due to their differentiative potential, immunosuppressive effects, and relative ease of culture. It is thought that the paracrine activity of MSCs helps mediate these effects – indeed, there have been numerous in vivo studies demonstrating the therapeutic effects of MSC-derived exosomes. The potential of MSC-derived exosomes in promoting tissue regeneration has gathered great interest, and is an exciting avenue for further research.
This research topic aims to consolidate the current advancements made in understanding MSC-derived exosomes. Current insights into their mechanisms of action, therapeutic potential, and methods in altering their properties are welcome.

- How do exosomes interact with residential cells?
- What molecular/cellular mechanisms are behind exosome-promoted tissue regeneration?
- What is the functional difference between exosomes from different stem cells?
- What modifications can be made to exosomes to enhance their therapeutic potential?
- What methods are there for enhancing exosomes’ biological function in tissue regeneration (for example, how can different biomolecules be loaded into exosomes)?

Keywords: exosome, stem cell, tissue regeneration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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