Skip to main content

About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 06 January 2023

As our understanding of the pathogenesis of cancers grows and new treatment modalities become available, so too does the number of key research questions in oncology that need answering. Frontiers in Oncology is working with members of our Editorial Board to tackle some of these key questions through Editor’s Challenges, each of which pose a key question in the oncology field.

We are delighted to present this Editor’s Challenge, led by Dr. Mohamed Rahouma, and in collaboration with Dr. Magdy and Dr. Baudo, asking how we can optimize the management and treatment of cardiac tumors and cardiac complications of cancer?

Optimizing the Management and Treatment of Cardiac Tumors and Cardiac Complications of Cancer
Cardiac tumors (CTs) are rare and are categorized as benign or malignant CTs. Malignant CTs are further divided into primary cardiac tumors (PCTs) and secondary cardiac tumors (SCTs). In contrast to previous investigations reporting a higher prevalence of SCTs than PCTs, more recent studies have shown a change in the trend of cardiac tumors, with both PCTs and SCTs having an almost equal prevalence.

While the most common form of CTs is myxoma, the most common forms of malignant PCTs are sarcomas (especially angiosarcomas), followed by lymphomas and mesotheliomas, and survival rates for patients with these tumors are poor. SCTs arising from metastasis are common in patients with advanced breast, lung and esophageal cancers and melanomas. Surgical resection is one of the key treatment modalities for CTs, in addition to systemic therapy and radiotherapy; however, cardiac transplantation has recently emerged as an additional option.

Although cardiac tumors are rare, they are often associated with significant complications including cardiac outflow obstruction and fatal arrhythmias. Therefore, there is a need to optimize the management of patients with CTs in order to improve survival outcomes.

This Editor’s Challenge Research Topic invites manuscripts exploring the management and treatment of PCTs and SCTs, and their associated complications. Potential themes include:
- Advances in the diagnosis of cardiac tumors
- Surgical approaches to the treatment of cardiac tumors including cardiac transplantation
- Novel treatment approaches for cardiac tumors
- Studies exploring cardiac complications of cancer

Please note: manuscripts consisting solely of bioinformatics or computational analysis of public genomic or transcriptomic databases which are not accompanied by validation (independent cohort or biological validation in vitro or in vivo) are out of scope for this section and will not be accepted as part of this Research Topic.

Keywords: cardiac tumors, cardiac complications, myxoma, sarcoma, angiosarcoma, mesothelioma, surgical resection, cardiac surgery, cardiac transplantation, cardiac outflow obstruction, arrythmia


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

As our understanding of the pathogenesis of cancers grows and new treatment modalities become available, so too does the number of key research questions in oncology that need answering. Frontiers in Oncology is working with members of our Editorial Board to tackle some of these key questions through Editor’s Challenges, each of which pose a key question in the oncology field.

We are delighted to present this Editor’s Challenge, led by Dr. Mohamed Rahouma, and in collaboration with Dr. Magdy and Dr. Baudo, asking how we can optimize the management and treatment of cardiac tumors and cardiac complications of cancer?

Optimizing the Management and Treatment of Cardiac Tumors and Cardiac Complications of Cancer
Cardiac tumors (CTs) are rare and are categorized as benign or malignant CTs. Malignant CTs are further divided into primary cardiac tumors (PCTs) and secondary cardiac tumors (SCTs). In contrast to previous investigations reporting a higher prevalence of SCTs than PCTs, more recent studies have shown a change in the trend of cardiac tumors, with both PCTs and SCTs having an almost equal prevalence.

While the most common form of CTs is myxoma, the most common forms of malignant PCTs are sarcomas (especially angiosarcomas), followed by lymphomas and mesotheliomas, and survival rates for patients with these tumors are poor. SCTs arising from metastasis are common in patients with advanced breast, lung and esophageal cancers and melanomas. Surgical resection is one of the key treatment modalities for CTs, in addition to systemic therapy and radiotherapy; however, cardiac transplantation has recently emerged as an additional option.

Although cardiac tumors are rare, they are often associated with significant complications including cardiac outflow obstruction and fatal arrhythmias. Therefore, there is a need to optimize the management of patients with CTs in order to improve survival outcomes.

This Editor’s Challenge Research Topic invites manuscripts exploring the management and treatment of PCTs and SCTs, and their associated complications. Potential themes include:
- Advances in the diagnosis of cardiac tumors
- Surgical approaches to the treatment of cardiac tumors including cardiac transplantation
- Novel treatment approaches for cardiac tumors
- Studies exploring cardiac complications of cancer

Please note: manuscripts consisting solely of bioinformatics or computational analysis of public genomic or transcriptomic databases which are not accompanied by validation (independent cohort or biological validation in vitro or in vivo) are out of scope for this section and will not be accepted as part of this Research Topic.

Keywords: cardiac tumors, cardiac complications, myxoma, sarcoma, angiosarcoma, mesothelioma, surgical resection, cardiac surgery, cardiac transplantation, cardiac outflow obstruction, arrythmia


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

Articles

Sort by:

Loading..

Authors

Loading..

views

total views views downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.