Research Topic

Research Advances in Dengue Virus

About this Research Topic

Dengue virus (DENV) belongs to the Flavivirus genus and is transmitted by mosquitoes, including Aedes albopictus and Ae. aegypti. There are four serotypes of DENV (DEVN 1–4), which can cause a spectrum of outcomes ranging from subclinical to death. Four serotypes (DENV 1–4) are circulating in tropical and ...

Dengue virus (DENV) belongs to the Flavivirus genus and is transmitted by mosquitoes, including Aedes albopictus and Ae. aegypti. There are four serotypes of DENV (DEVN 1–4), which can cause a spectrum of outcomes ranging from subclinical to death. Four serotypes (DENV 1–4) are circulating in tropical and subtropical regions and are found in over 100 countries, threatening 2.5 billion people worldwide. The World Health Organisation (WHO) declared that climate change has provided DENV with a vastly expanded geographical range and that the distribution of DENV has grown dramatically worldwide over the years. Moreover, secondary heterotypic infection or waning immunity of infants born to mothers infected by DENV has significantly increased the likelihood of acquiring a severe disease. Antibody (Ab)-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to be involved in this immunopathogenesis of severe dengue forms, including dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The immune pathogenesis mechanism caused by dengue virus infection has become an important area of research.

The Global WHO Strategy for dengue prevention and control 2012–20 aims to reduce dengue mortality by at least 50% and morbidity from dengue by at least 25%. Several dengue vaccine candidates are in development. In particular, twin phase 3 clinical trials were initiated in Asia and Latin America to assess the efficacy of a tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV). Studies and robust surveillance systems will be necessary to evaluate vaccine efficacy. In addition, more effective immunotherapy and vaccine is still the main focus of the current research.

In this Research Topic, we encourage the submission of reviews and mini reviews, original research reports, methods articles, in the following (but not limited to) topics:
- Viral genetics and epidemiological surveillance;
- Development and validation of diagnostic methods;
- Prevention and control strategies, including the development of immunotherapies and vaccines;
- The correlation between Dengue and other Flavivirus
- Viral pathogenesis and host- viral interactions
- Viral infection and innate immunity


Keywords: Dengue Virus, epidemiology, vaccine, viral pathogenesis, innate immunity


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Submission Deadlines

05 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

05 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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