Research Topic

New Perspectives on the Biology of Nectaries and Nectars

About this Research Topic

Nectar is one of the key developments in the evolution of plant-animal mutualisms. Floral nectar (FN) attracts pollinators, whereas extrafloral nectar (EFN) recruits insects that defend plants against herbivory. Even though nearly 90% of angiosperms produce nectar, many aspects of the biology of nectaries and nectars have been historically understudied, particularly at the molecular and ecosystem levels. However, a number of recent exciting reports have fundamentally changed our understanding of how nectaries evolved, how nectaries develop, how nectar is produced, and how the chemical composition of nectar affects both mutualists and antagonists, suggesting new ecological scenarios. These findings truly span the range of molecules to ecosystems. To consolidate new fundamental research on this topic we will solicit manuscripts from authors who study both FN and EFN from multiple perspectives, whose findings may have broad implications in the understanding of nectar/y evolution, development, and function.


Keywords: Nectaries, Nectars, Nectar, Floral nectar, Extrafloral nectar


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Nectar is one of the key developments in the evolution of plant-animal mutualisms. Floral nectar (FN) attracts pollinators, whereas extrafloral nectar (EFN) recruits insects that defend plants against herbivory. Even though nearly 90% of angiosperms produce nectar, many aspects of the biology of nectaries and nectars have been historically understudied, particularly at the molecular and ecosystem levels. However, a number of recent exciting reports have fundamentally changed our understanding of how nectaries evolved, how nectaries develop, how nectar is produced, and how the chemical composition of nectar affects both mutualists and antagonists, suggesting new ecological scenarios. These findings truly span the range of molecules to ecosystems. To consolidate new fundamental research on this topic we will solicit manuscripts from authors who study both FN and EFN from multiple perspectives, whose findings may have broad implications in the understanding of nectar/y evolution, development, and function.


Keywords: Nectaries, Nectars, Nectar, Floral nectar, Extrafloral nectar


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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