Research Topic

Current State of Postural Research - Beyond Automatic Behavior

About this Research Topic

The concept of posture control has morphed over the past century from a reflex, hierarchically controlled, innate behavior to a complex and adaptable motor act highly influenced by cognitive processes as well as confidence and attentiveness of the performer. In addition, multisensory control of posture has been recognized as a process of fusion and integration rather than summation and inhibition. Advances in computational modeling and imaging have revealed that higher cortical centers are involved in production of what were previously believed to be stereotypical, triggered reactions. Emerging evidence now supports the idea that postural behaviors are regulated by distributed control in the neuraxis and shaped by dynamic interactions of sensorimotor processes in a task- and context-dependent manner.

The main purpose of this Research Topic is to encourage conversation between basic and applied researchers to improve the current frameworks used to study the networks and the phenomenology of postural control. We welcome contributions in the form of original research papers, review articles, technical reports and commentaries focusing on theories and new methods for studying the control of posture. We are particularly interested in cross-disciplinary empirical or modeling studies to ask:
• Is posture separately controlled in task performance?
• Can posture be independently trained?
• How much input is enough to produce an effective postural response?
• What factors are essential for control of balance and orientation?
• Are there different control pathways for predictive and reactive postural reactions?
• What control pathways are involved when a fall is imminent?
• What are the factors that make posture variable, i.e., are all balance reactions or movement strategies stereotypical?
• How does perception and attention influence postural action?

Researchers involved in fundamental and clinical studies using neurophysiological and neuroimaging tools, including non-invasive brain stimulation, functional and structural MRI approaches, as well as computer modeling, are encouraged to contribute to this Research Topic.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The concept of posture control has morphed over the past century from a reflex, hierarchically controlled, innate behavior to a complex and adaptable motor act highly influenced by cognitive processes as well as confidence and attentiveness of the performer. In addition, multisensory control of posture has been recognized as a process of fusion and integration rather than summation and inhibition. Advances in computational modeling and imaging have revealed that higher cortical centers are involved in production of what were previously believed to be stereotypical, triggered reactions. Emerging evidence now supports the idea that postural behaviors are regulated by distributed control in the neuraxis and shaped by dynamic interactions of sensorimotor processes in a task- and context-dependent manner.

The main purpose of this Research Topic is to encourage conversation between basic and applied researchers to improve the current frameworks used to study the networks and the phenomenology of postural control. We welcome contributions in the form of original research papers, review articles, technical reports and commentaries focusing on theories and new methods for studying the control of posture. We are particularly interested in cross-disciplinary empirical or modeling studies to ask:
• Is posture separately controlled in task performance?
• Can posture be independently trained?
• How much input is enough to produce an effective postural response?
• What factors are essential for control of balance and orientation?
• Are there different control pathways for predictive and reactive postural reactions?
• What control pathways are involved when a fall is imminent?
• What are the factors that make posture variable, i.e., are all balance reactions or movement strategies stereotypical?
• How does perception and attention influence postural action?

Researchers involved in fundamental and clinical studies using neurophysiological and neuroimaging tools, including non-invasive brain stimulation, functional and structural MRI approaches, as well as computer modeling, are encouraged to contribute to this Research Topic.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 December 2017 Abstract
31 May 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 December 2017 Abstract
31 May 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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