Research Topic

Microbe-Mediated Processes in Soils

About this Research Topic

Although only few chemical elements (H, O, C, N, P and S) are building blocks of microbial cells, microorganisms have evolved over several billion years to use every energy source available on earth. Different microbes require distinct nutrients for their catabolic and anabolic reactions. However, considering that the vast majority of these organisms live in communities, such huge metabolic diversity allows them to metabolize at least fifty different chemical elements. Given this wide versatility, microorganisms play an essential role in virtually all biogeochemical and elemental cycles on Earth, and are key to maintaining soil fertility and homeostasis. As human populations continue to increase, so too do rates of soil fertility loss, soil erosion, land conversion and fossil fuel use with drastic consequences for the composition of our atmosphere and therefore climate change. Soil microbial processes are integral to these biogeochemical changes. It is therefore critical that we understand them if we are to model, predict and find meaningful solutions to these issues. There are numerous questions surrounding the role of Bacteria and Archaea in soil, and we have a limited understanding of the interplay between eukaryotic microbes and soil processes.
In this context, this Research Topic will focus on important advances and perspectives of microbe-mediated processes in soils. Examples include but are not restricted to the use of soil microbes to mitigate the increasing levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases including methane and nitrous oxides, improvement of soil fertility through the enhancement nutrient availabilities or impacts on soil structure, or the direct promotion of plant growth, or the eukaryotic involvement in soil development and key biogeochemical cycles.
In this Research Topic, we look forward to collect both basic and applied studies related to this field. We encourage contributions (original research papers, review/mini-review papers, book reviews, short communications, and case reports/case studies) about all aspects of microbe-mediated processes in soils.


Keywords: Terrestrial ecology, microbial community, climate change, biogeochemical cycles, sustainable energy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Although only few chemical elements (H, O, C, N, P and S) are building blocks of microbial cells, microorganisms have evolved over several billion years to use every energy source available on earth. Different microbes require distinct nutrients for their catabolic and anabolic reactions. However, considering that the vast majority of these organisms live in communities, such huge metabolic diversity allows them to metabolize at least fifty different chemical elements. Given this wide versatility, microorganisms play an essential role in virtually all biogeochemical and elemental cycles on Earth, and are key to maintaining soil fertility and homeostasis. As human populations continue to increase, so too do rates of soil fertility loss, soil erosion, land conversion and fossil fuel use with drastic consequences for the composition of our atmosphere and therefore climate change. Soil microbial processes are integral to these biogeochemical changes. It is therefore critical that we understand them if we are to model, predict and find meaningful solutions to these issues. There are numerous questions surrounding the role of Bacteria and Archaea in soil, and we have a limited understanding of the interplay between eukaryotic microbes and soil processes.
In this context, this Research Topic will focus on important advances and perspectives of microbe-mediated processes in soils. Examples include but are not restricted to the use of soil microbes to mitigate the increasing levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases including methane and nitrous oxides, improvement of soil fertility through the enhancement nutrient availabilities or impacts on soil structure, or the direct promotion of plant growth, or the eukaryotic involvement in soil development and key biogeochemical cycles.
In this Research Topic, we look forward to collect both basic and applied studies related to this field. We encourage contributions (original research papers, review/mini-review papers, book reviews, short communications, and case reports/case studies) about all aspects of microbe-mediated processes in soils.


Keywords: Terrestrial ecology, microbial community, climate change, biogeochemical cycles, sustainable energy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2018 Abstract
31 August 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2018 Abstract
31 August 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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