Research Topic

Certification Cycles and Real Driving Emissions

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For many decades, driving cycles have been employed for the homologation of new vehicles all over the world. Certification cycles have been developed and employed for light-duty cars and vans, and motorcycles in the form of chassis-dynamometer testing, as well as for heavy-duty and non-road vehicles/engines ...

For many decades, driving cycles have been employed for the homologation of new vehicles all over the world. Certification cycles have been developed and employed for light-duty cars and vans, and motorcycles in the form of chassis-dynamometer testing, as well as for heavy-duty and non-road vehicles/engines in the form of engine-dynamometer testing. Application of a driving cycle for the certification of new vehicles means that a usually broad part of the engine’s operating envelope is put under test; the very important, and critical in terms of pollutants and CO2 emissions, transient operation is thus taken into account.

Nevertheless, it is rather safe to assume that no (legislated) cycle will ever fully cover the whole engine/vehicle operating range. Perhaps the most notable example here is the New European Driving Cycle, a highly stylized, modal driving schedule valid in Europe for many decades. Its simplified form, clearly unrepresentative of real-world driving, coupled with loopholes in the legislation have often been manipulated by the engine manufacturers for the benefit of the customers (lower fuel consumption and higher torque) but at the expense of the environment. As numerous real-world driving tests have demonstrated in the last decade, the usually manipulated pollutant here is nitrogen oxides (from diesel-powered cars), owing to their inverse relation with fuel consumption. That is why real driving emission tests (RDE) are gaining increased attention in the legislation as, for example, the one that has been recently implemented in the European Union for the certification of new passenger cars.

This Research Topic is aiming to gather innovative research and highlight recent advances on various engines and vehicles issues during driving cycles and real driving emissions procedures, e.g.:
• Pollutants formation (particulate matter, NOx, CO, HC, noise);
• CO2 emissions and fuel/energy consumption;
• Exhaust after-treatment (three-way catalysts, oxidation catalysts, diesel and gasoline par-ticulate filters, SCR, NOx adsorbers);
• Internal measures for emissions control (EGR, water injection, etc);
• Organic Rankine cycles (ORC);
• Turbocharging;
• Hybrid electric engine operation;
• Alternative fuels and biofuels effects;
• Certification/type approval legislation;
• Driving cycles construction.
• Engine control issues;
• Experimental facilities, testing and challenges;
• Driving cycles construction and development.


Keywords: Driving cycles, Real driving emissions, Certification, Pollutant emissions, CO2 emissions, Vehicles, Fuel consumption


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