Research Topic

Genomic Advances and Challenges in Old and New World Camelids

About this Research Topic

This topic has been realized, and is in collaboration with Professor Faisal Al-Mathen, Associate Professor of Animal Genetics and Breeding at the College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Resources at King Faisal University.
Genomic ...

This topic has been realized, and is in collaboration with Professor Faisal Al-Mathen, Associate Professor of Animal Genetics and Breeding at the College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Resources at King Faisal University.
Genomic information about camelids has advanced tremendously over the past 5 years. The full genome sequences of alpaca, dromedary, wild and domestic Bactrian camels are now available (at varying levels of completion). There is a real interest and increasing demand in the valuable and often unique traits of the different camelid species. Unlike other major livestock species, Camelids do not yet enjoy the widespread use of scientifically informed production and sustainable management systems. Their adaptation to diverse and harsh environments and pathogens has produced a huge genetic diversity that needs to be conserved, while carefully being subjected to anthropogenic selection.
This Research Topic addresses all aspects (advances and challenges) of camelid evolution, ecology, population and landscape genomics/ genetics, genotyping (SNP chip) and breeding systems and strategies, as well as the long neglected systematic description and collection of physiologically and economically relevant phenotypes. There is a need to understand the mechanisms of adaptation, thermo tolerance and the response to pathogens and changing environments. It is necessary to develop production systems that are suitable for smallholder and modern commercial farming for the benefits of the camelids as well as for the humans relying on them.

In this Research Topic we call authors to submit their results and hypotheses on small and large camelids, including all aspects on camelid genomics, including phenotypes. Authors are welcome to contribute information on the following topics: camelid evolution, ecology, population and landscape genetics, breeding strategies and sustainable management, conservation genetics, physiology and thermo tolerance, response to pathogens and inherited traits of commercial significance.
We consider all types of articles, starting from brief research reports (2000 words) and case reports (3000 words) to original articles (12000 words), mini (3000 words) and full (12000 words) reviews, methods and protocols (12000 words), as well as opinions (2000 words), perspectives (3000 words) and hypothesis and theory (12000 words) articles. It is high time to give the camelids the research focus and visibility which they deserve.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

29 October 2018 Manuscript
26 December 2018 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

29 October 2018 Manuscript
26 December 2018 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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