Research Topic

Discovery of novel plant-derived compounds with antibacterial actions against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

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About this Research Topic

The broad and often indiscriminate use of antimicrobials in human and veterinary medicine and in agriculture for non-therapeutic purposes has resulted in the widespread antimicrobial resistance problem. Consequently, many first-line antibacterial agents have become ineffective. Therefore there is a necessary ...

The broad and often indiscriminate use of antimicrobials in human and veterinary medicine and in agriculture for non-therapeutic purposes has resulted in the widespread antimicrobial resistance problem. Consequently, many first-line antibacterial agents have become ineffective. Therefore there is a necessary and urgent need to discover novel antibacterial agents effective against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Nature is a reservoir for antimicrobial agents. Specifically, numerous plant-derived compounds have been proven to harbor antibacterial properties. In addition, some plant-derived compounds have been shown to inhibit bacterial virulence factors, including quorum sensing, biofilm formation, motility, toxins, pigments, enzymes, and surfactants, and to have lower effective concentrations than the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Therefore, plant-derived antibacterial compounds may represent a promising alternative to traditional antibiotics, whilst their efficacy against antibiotic-resistant bacteria has not been entirely determined yet.

This Research Topic aims to bring together the most recent research progress on the characterization of novel plant-derived compounds with antibacterial actions against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We encourage the submission of original research articles, perspectives, opinion articles, and reviews focusing on antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mainly but not restricted to Bacillus cereus, Burkholderia cepacia, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus mutans, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Serratia marcescens.

Potential topics may include but are not limited to:

• Discovery and molecular mechanisms of novel medicinal plants/plant-derived compounds with bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity
• Discovery and molecular mechanisms of novel medicinal plants/plant-derived compounds targeting bacterial virulence factors such as quorum sensing, biofilm formation, motility, toxins, pigments, enzymes, and surfactants
• Antibacterial activity of nanoparticle-based plant-derived compounds
• Application of novel medicinal plants/plant-derived compounds in food production to prevent food spoilage
• Application of novel medicinal plants/plant-derived compounds as antibiotic alternatives in animal feed


Keywords: Natural Products, Medicinal Plants, Bactericidal Action, Virulence Factors, Antimicrobials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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