Research Topic

Inclusive Science Communication in Theory and Practice

About this Research Topic

Science Communication is a broad term that encompasses formal and informal science education; public health messaging; promotion of science in public, policy, and political spheres; professional communication within and across disciplines; and the interrelated beats of science, environmental, health, and medical journalism. There is a correspondingly broad diversity of interests, objectives, and approaches among those involved in the study and practice of science communication. However, as within science itself, there is persistent underrepresentation of historically marginalized racial, ethnic, cultural, religious, gender, and socioeconomic groups among scholars and practitioners of science communication, as well as the audiences they seek to address and engage.

The result is a disconnect between the multicultural nature of the society within which we live and the strategies and mechanisms used to communicate science. Evidence from social science studies and the practice of science communication strongly suggests that effective science communication and public engagement require moving past narrow conceptions of audience and the confines of the deficit model. To address these challenges, science communication scholars and practitioners must prioritize inclusion, equity, and intersectionality to decrease this disconnect and extend the reach and effectiveness of science communication so that efforts can engage and benefit all members of society.

We seek contributions from practitioners and scholars of science communication that move beyond documenting the barriers to inclusion and diversity that exist within science communication fields, to strategies and solutions that can help increase inclusion, equity, and diversity, and examinations of the impacts when those strategies and solutions are implemented. Submitted manuscripts may include original research papers, case studies, reflective essays, critical reviews, and other forms of contribution as outlined in Frontiers guidelines here: https://www.frontiersin.org/about/author-guidelines.


Picture: Linh Do. License: CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)


Keywords: science communication, science journalism, diversity, inclusion, practice


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Science Communication is a broad term that encompasses formal and informal science education; public health messaging; promotion of science in public, policy, and political spheres; professional communication within and across disciplines; and the interrelated beats of science, environmental, health, and medical journalism. There is a correspondingly broad diversity of interests, objectives, and approaches among those involved in the study and practice of science communication. However, as within science itself, there is persistent underrepresentation of historically marginalized racial, ethnic, cultural, religious, gender, and socioeconomic groups among scholars and practitioners of science communication, as well as the audiences they seek to address and engage.

The result is a disconnect between the multicultural nature of the society within which we live and the strategies and mechanisms used to communicate science. Evidence from social science studies and the practice of science communication strongly suggests that effective science communication and public engagement require moving past narrow conceptions of audience and the confines of the deficit model. To address these challenges, science communication scholars and practitioners must prioritize inclusion, equity, and intersectionality to decrease this disconnect and extend the reach and effectiveness of science communication so that efforts can engage and benefit all members of society.

We seek contributions from practitioners and scholars of science communication that move beyond documenting the barriers to inclusion and diversity that exist within science communication fields, to strategies and solutions that can help increase inclusion, equity, and diversity, and examinations of the impacts when those strategies and solutions are implemented. Submitted manuscripts may include original research papers, case studies, reflective essays, critical reviews, and other forms of contribution as outlined in Frontiers guidelines here: https://www.frontiersin.org/about/author-guidelines.


Picture: Linh Do. License: CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)


Keywords: science communication, science journalism, diversity, inclusion, practice


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2019 Abstract
31 July 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2019 Abstract
31 July 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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