Research Topic

Evolutionary Biomechanics of Sound Production and Reception

About this Research Topic

Acoustic communication occurs widely across organisms, including animals and plants. It involves the production of rapid vibrations that generate compression waves that travel away from the source in a fluid medium, such as air or water, or promulgate in a solid medium in the form of vibrations. Acoustic communication can take the form of active acoustic signaling, whereby the signaler emits a sound which is detected by a receiver; or passive acoustic signaling, where one organism communicates by reflecting sound produced to the signaler. There is an unrivaled diversity of sound production structures and mechanisms, from the stridulating feathers of birds, sound-producing tymbals of cicadas to acoustic deflectors of carnivorous pitcher plants. The integration of biomechanics alongside ecological and evolutionary perspectives of signal production and reception is fundamental in understanding the limits and costs of acoustic communication. This can include the ecological and evolutionary drivers, as well as the limits and constraints of biomechanical structures and physical forces that in combination act on sound production and reception.

This topic will highlight the latest findings and perspectives in the evolutionary biomechanics of sound production and reception in a diverse range of organisms, with a special emphasis on understanding the evolutionary drivers of structure innovation. Our aim is to produce new insights, identify key gaps in our understanding, and stimulate new research using novel techniques. We aim to attract studies across a broad taxonomic range (both invertebrates and vertebrates) to investigate the generality of these effects. We are especially interested in:

• studies investigating how sound production or reception structures and behaviors have evolved, especially with regard to production or detection of extremely high or low calls;
• studies highlighting patterns of variation in sound production and reception; and
• studies considering convergent evolution of sounds and structures across taxonomic groups.


Keywords: Bioacoustics, Biomechanics, Biophysics, Laser, Insect hearing


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Acoustic communication occurs widely across organisms, including animals and plants. It involves the production of rapid vibrations that generate compression waves that travel away from the source in a fluid medium, such as air or water, or promulgate in a solid medium in the form of vibrations. Acoustic communication can take the form of active acoustic signaling, whereby the signaler emits a sound which is detected by a receiver; or passive acoustic signaling, where one organism communicates by reflecting sound produced to the signaler. There is an unrivaled diversity of sound production structures and mechanisms, from the stridulating feathers of birds, sound-producing tymbals of cicadas to acoustic deflectors of carnivorous pitcher plants. The integration of biomechanics alongside ecological and evolutionary perspectives of signal production and reception is fundamental in understanding the limits and costs of acoustic communication. This can include the ecological and evolutionary drivers, as well as the limits and constraints of biomechanical structures and physical forces that in combination act on sound production and reception.

This topic will highlight the latest findings and perspectives in the evolutionary biomechanics of sound production and reception in a diverse range of organisms, with a special emphasis on understanding the evolutionary drivers of structure innovation. Our aim is to produce new insights, identify key gaps in our understanding, and stimulate new research using novel techniques. We aim to attract studies across a broad taxonomic range (both invertebrates and vertebrates) to investigate the generality of these effects. We are especially interested in:

• studies investigating how sound production or reception structures and behaviors have evolved, especially with regard to production or detection of extremely high or low calls;
• studies highlighting patterns of variation in sound production and reception; and
• studies considering convergent evolution of sounds and structures across taxonomic groups.


Keywords: Bioacoustics, Biomechanics, Biophysics, Laser, Insect hearing


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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