Research Topic

Source and Effects of Light to Moderate Magnitude Earthquakes

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About this Research Topic

Light to moderate magnitude (4-5.9) earthquakes have repeatedly demonstrated to be potentially damaging, also producing victims and severe effects in case of shallow source depth and proximity to population centers. They are more frequent than larger ones and the analysis of their source characteristics helps ...

Light to moderate magnitude (4-5.9) earthquakes have repeatedly demonstrated to be potentially damaging, also producing victims and severe effects in case of shallow source depth and proximity to population centers. They are more frequent than larger ones and the analysis of their source characteristics helps in the definition of active structures and may contribute to the assessment of the stress level. Usually this is also the range of the maximum magnitude for seismic events induced by volcanic processes, their investigation is greatly important for defining the characteristics of the volcanic activity and its possible evolution toward critical states. In addition to natural seismicity, several significant earthquakes recognized as induced by human activity are within this magnitude range and the analysis of their source characteristics is crucial to understand their genesis. Besides, the characterization of moderate-earthquake sources – as independent components or in combination with other types of seismic sources – is increasingly becoming an essential element in seismic hazard analyses.

While the source of strong and major earthquakes is commonly investigated by the use of well-established techniques and, anyway, are suitable for the development and the application of new methods, the analysis of moderate magnitude earthquakes is way more challenging. In particular, the relatively lower signal-to-noise ratio can make it difficult to estimate essential parameters to define the source dynamics and kinematics, and requires more detailed knowledge of propagation media. Consequently, it is necessary to implement specific methods to overcome these drawbacks. Several published studies proposed multi-approach methods – as is the case for source directivity or scaling laws analyses – or multi-data investigations, in particular when a single dataset does not provide unique solution for the source geometry, for instance.

This Research Topic is aimed at stimulating a broad discussion, bringing to the development of new techniques and investigation strategies in the analysis of light to moderate magnitude earthquakes, potentially contributing to increase the resolution of the current analyses and to reduce uncertainties.

To this aim we welcome articles analyzing the source and the effects of light to moderate magnitude earthquakes, based on geophysical, geological, and macroseismic data, and focused on:

• tectonic and and induced seismicity;
• volcanic seismicity;
• recent case studies and reappraisal of historical events;
• seismic hazard analyses;
• numerical modeling of source and propagation;
• comparison of distinct approaches or joint multi-approach analyses;
• multi-data analyses.


Keywords: Earthquake source, multidata analyses, multiapproach methods, theory and applications, natural and induced seismicity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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