Research Topic

Biomaterials in Directing Fate of Cells Involved in Bone Healing Cascades

About this Research Topic

Treatment of large bone defects still represents a clinical challenge for which tissue engineering strategies aim at offering alternative treatments to replace the conventional use of autografts. In the last decades, a significant effort has been made in the development of synthetic biomaterials from a variety of materials (e.g. hydrogels, bioceramics or resorbable polymers). However, only small numbers of biomaterials have reached clinical use, and they are often limited to treat small defects. New biomaterials-based tissue engineering approaches should consider the complex and overlapping physiological bone healing cascades to better harness the endogenous healing potential. The understanding of such a dynamic biological environment could lead to a blueprint for designing and fabrication of the next generation of biomaterials.

Several tissues (bone marrow, periosteum, endosteum, vasculature; muscle tissue, and nerve tissue), cells ( e.g., macrophages, granulocytes, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts, endothelial and mesenchymal stem cell) and signaling molecules are involved in the bone healing process through the inflammatory stage, bone formation, and remodeling phase.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel researches that are focused on understanding the interaction of biomaterials with cells involved in a different stage of bone healing, evaluation of biomaterials capacity to alter the healing cascades in vitro or in vivo and strategies to develop in vitro models that mimic bone healing phases to asses efficacy of biomaterials.

Scope :
• Biomaterials mediated osteoimmunomodualtion
• Biomaterials cues for governing inflammatory response
• Strategies to enhance the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of biomaterials
• In-vitro models to mimic distinct phases of bone healing for predicting biomaterials performance in the repair of bone defects
• Biomaterials to dictate the mode of in vivo bone formation


Keywords: Bone healing, Inflammation, Osteoimmunomodulation, Tissue engineering, Healing cascades


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Treatment of large bone defects still represents a clinical challenge for which tissue engineering strategies aim at offering alternative treatments to replace the conventional use of autografts. In the last decades, a significant effort has been made in the development of synthetic biomaterials from a variety of materials (e.g. hydrogels, bioceramics or resorbable polymers). However, only small numbers of biomaterials have reached clinical use, and they are often limited to treat small defects. New biomaterials-based tissue engineering approaches should consider the complex and overlapping physiological bone healing cascades to better harness the endogenous healing potential. The understanding of such a dynamic biological environment could lead to a blueprint for designing and fabrication of the next generation of biomaterials.

Several tissues (bone marrow, periosteum, endosteum, vasculature; muscle tissue, and nerve tissue), cells ( e.g., macrophages, granulocytes, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts, endothelial and mesenchymal stem cell) and signaling molecules are involved in the bone healing process through the inflammatory stage, bone formation, and remodeling phase.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel researches that are focused on understanding the interaction of biomaterials with cells involved in a different stage of bone healing, evaluation of biomaterials capacity to alter the healing cascades in vitro or in vivo and strategies to develop in vitro models that mimic bone healing phases to asses efficacy of biomaterials.

Scope :
• Biomaterials mediated osteoimmunomodualtion
• Biomaterials cues for governing inflammatory response
• Strategies to enhance the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of biomaterials
• In-vitro models to mimic distinct phases of bone healing for predicting biomaterials performance in the repair of bone defects
• Biomaterials to dictate the mode of in vivo bone formation


Keywords: Bone healing, Inflammation, Osteoimmunomodulation, Tissue engineering, Healing cascades


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

17 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

17 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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