Research Topic

The Tribute of Physiology for the Understanding of COVID-19 Disease

About this Research Topic

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic provided an unprecedented challenge to the scientific community to solve this worldwide threat. The great challenge to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms raised by this pathogen agent has provided a huge amount of data and hypotheses in a very short period of time. Indeed, given the rapid pace of scientific discoveries and clinical data generated by the large number of people infected by SARS-CoV-2, health workers still need accurate evidence regarding the symptom expression, pathophysiology and potential targets as well as the propagation of the viral infection. The COVID-19 infection appears to target several organs and systems with different temporalities suggesting that a transdisciplinary and clinically oriented approach could help to unravel the potential targets of the virus. Furthermore, the disease itself represents a unique opportunity to improve our knowledge on the physiological systems.

The aim of this Research Topic is to provide a better understanding of the interaction between COVID-19 and physiological functions at different stages of organization, from genes to the whole living organism. During the recent months, a large amount of knowledge has been added to the various disciplinary fields, including the cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, respiratory/pulmonary, immune and neural systems and their physiological functions.

Furthermore, the roles of age, gender, smoking, metabolic disbalance, as well as immuno-allergic status (amongst many other factors) have been the basis for new hypotheses on both the COVID-19 infection itself but also on our knowledge of the interactions and relationships between these different physiological functions (e.g. anosmia and neurological symptoms). The Guest Editors of this Research Topic will consider inter-disciplinary opinions and views, as well as original data and work, from cells to organisms, which could help to re-evaluate our knowledge and the evolutionary importance of the different physiological systems targeted by SARS-Cov-2.

We particularly welcome contributions that include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

- COVID-19 and the cardio-vascular system: Understanding the micro/macro-vascular dysfunction
- COVID-19 and the respiratory system: What is the real target of SARS-CoV-2?
- COVID-19 and the kidney: Glomerular, tubular, vascular and interstitial disorders
- COVID-19 and the gastrointestinal system: molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the short and long-term effects
- COVID-19 and the neural system: Anosmia and other neurophysiologic manifestations
- COVID-19 and the endocrine system: The door open on the physiology of the renin-angiotensin system
- COVID-19 and metabolic, cardiovascular and kidney diseases: Where is the link? - Studying molecular-physiological pathways.
- COVID-19 pathophysiology and the hematopoietic system
- Understanding the pathophysiology of COVID-19 symptoms, including sensory loss, muscle pain, gastrointestinal problems, among others.
- COVID-19 and Darwin: The important contribution of virus to the evolution of physiological systems
- Living with the COVID-19 threat: which place for the physiologist?

The Guest Editors are interested in receiving manuscripts which are investigating the aforementioned subtopics using systems biology and computational physiology approaches.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic provided an unprecedented challenge to the scientific community to solve this worldwide threat. The great challenge to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms raised by this pathogen agent has provided a huge amount of data and hypotheses in a very short period of time. Indeed, given the rapid pace of scientific discoveries and clinical data generated by the large number of people infected by SARS-CoV-2, health workers still need accurate evidence regarding the symptom expression, pathophysiology and potential targets as well as the propagation of the viral infection. The COVID-19 infection appears to target several organs and systems with different temporalities suggesting that a transdisciplinary and clinically oriented approach could help to unravel the potential targets of the virus. Furthermore, the disease itself represents a unique opportunity to improve our knowledge on the physiological systems.

The aim of this Research Topic is to provide a better understanding of the interaction between COVID-19 and physiological functions at different stages of organization, from genes to the whole living organism. During the recent months, a large amount of knowledge has been added to the various disciplinary fields, including the cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, respiratory/pulmonary, immune and neural systems and their physiological functions.

Furthermore, the roles of age, gender, smoking, metabolic disbalance, as well as immuno-allergic status (amongst many other factors) have been the basis for new hypotheses on both the COVID-19 infection itself but also on our knowledge of the interactions and relationships between these different physiological functions (e.g. anosmia and neurological symptoms). The Guest Editors of this Research Topic will consider inter-disciplinary opinions and views, as well as original data and work, from cells to organisms, which could help to re-evaluate our knowledge and the evolutionary importance of the different physiological systems targeted by SARS-Cov-2.

We particularly welcome contributions that include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

- COVID-19 and the cardio-vascular system: Understanding the micro/macro-vascular dysfunction
- COVID-19 and the respiratory system: What is the real target of SARS-CoV-2?
- COVID-19 and the kidney: Glomerular, tubular, vascular and interstitial disorders
- COVID-19 and the gastrointestinal system: molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the short and long-term effects
- COVID-19 and the neural system: Anosmia and other neurophysiologic manifestations
- COVID-19 and the endocrine system: The door open on the physiology of the renin-angiotensin system
- COVID-19 and metabolic, cardiovascular and kidney diseases: Where is the link? - Studying molecular-physiological pathways.
- COVID-19 pathophysiology and the hematopoietic system
- Understanding the pathophysiology of COVID-19 symptoms, including sensory loss, muscle pain, gastrointestinal problems, among others.
- COVID-19 and Darwin: The important contribution of virus to the evolution of physiological systems
- Living with the COVID-19 threat: which place for the physiologist?

The Guest Editors are interested in receiving manuscripts which are investigating the aforementioned subtopics using systems biology and computational physiology approaches.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

17 July 2020 Abstract
30 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

17 July 2020 Abstract
30 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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