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Extreme precipitation events (EPE) have devastating impacts on nature, infrastructure and society in a short time. They can trigger a variety of other disastrous events such as floods, landslides, erosion, etc. often resulting in losses of lives and economic wealth. During the past decades, several approaches ...

Extreme precipitation events (EPE) have devastating impacts on nature, infrastructure and society in a short time. They can trigger a variety of other disastrous events such as floods, landslides, erosion, etc. often resulting in losses of lives and economic wealth. During the past decades, several approaches have been taken to understand the spatio-temporal variability of EPEs in terms of their origin, dependencies, frequency, magnitude and distribution. The performance of multiple datasets of precipitation (rain gauges, radar, satellite, microwave links, and reanalysis) in estimating EPEs at various temporal resolutions has been evaluated. Forecast agencies have been updating their Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models with better features (capturing atmospheric processes, model parametrization, boundary conditions, etc.) at finer spatial resolutions to forecast EPEs at least a few days in advance so that their negative impact can be reduced. Many researchers have developed post-processing techniques (such as bias correction and spatial downscaling) to statistically improve the meteorological forecasts obtained from NWPs. Climate change is an important aspect to consider for dealing with future EPEs. Also, a stronger focus is given recently to vulnerability and risk assessment as well as possible adaptation strategies. This Research Topic welcomes contributions covering all the aforementioned aspects related to EPEs.

This Research Topic will address all aspects related to extreme precipitation events as e.g.: their origin, dependencies, spatio-temporal patterns, interactions among scales, magnitude, distribution, effects of climate change as well as their often hazardous impact on society and nature. Articles dealing with the difficulties in understanding the atmospheric processes causing increased extreme precipitation events, incorporating them in precipitation forecasting and generation models, as well as assessing the impact of such events are also welcome.

The contributions to this Research Topic can cover the following themes:
(i) Spatio-temporal patterns and scale-dependencies in Extreme Precipitation Events (EPEs);
(ii) Assessment of available datasets from observed (rain gauges, satellite, and microwave links) and modelled rainfall (reanalysis, rainfall generators) for capturing EPEs;
(iii) Utility of the NWP forecasts in developing early warning of geohazards (floods, landslides, avalanches, etc.);
(iv) Assessment of climate change impacts on EPEs;
(v) Vulnerability and risk assessment.

Keywords: extreme events, forecasting, rainfall generation, downscaling, impact, vulnerability, climate change


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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