Research Topic

Integrating Multiple Scales in the Study of Species Distributions: From Habitat Fragmentation to Species Interactions

About this Research Topic

Both Landscape and Community Ecology have followed on parallel, non-intersecting, paths with Biogeography. Different scales of analysis separate these branches of Ecology. But can processes occurring at local to regional scales affect patterns manifested at biogeographical scales? Earlier research suggested that biotic interactions have no noticeable effect on species distributions at wider scales, but recent studies are challenging this view. Can biotic interactions, which occur at local scales, exhibit global patterns? Similarly, the effects of habitat modification are also starting to be considered relevant at biogeographical scales.

Either considering biotic interactions, habitat modification, or other local processes, nature does not discriminate scales, all are linked. It is the difficulty to integrate scales within conceptual and analytical frameworks that stands in the way of a unified approach to understanding biodiversity patterns across scales.

The goal of this Research Topic is to promote the development of innovative approaches to integrate ecological observations and analysis across spatial scales, with the aim of furthering knowledge about biodiversity patterns and processes and improving scientific insights going into conservation planning. In particular, we aim to address the gap between Community and Landscape Ecology and Biogeography. Manuscripts might address the following topics:
• To what extent are biotic interactions and habitat modification relevant in the context of range shifting species?
• In what conditions, if any, is the Eltonian Noise Hypothesis relevant?
• To what extent is the scale at which species explore the habitats relevant?
• Are there consistent empirical evidence for biogeographical patterns in ecological networks?

We welcome innovative ecological studies integrating multiple spatial scales of observation and analysis. Two main lines of inquiry are particularly encouraged: a) effects of biotic interactions across scales and their effect on the distribution of species at biogeographical scales b) the effects of habitat modification (either loss or fragmentation) on species current and future ranges across scales.

These are general categories, allowing for a wide variety of studies to be included in the Research Topic. However, manuscripts addressing other questions while integrating multiple scales in the analysis of biodiversity patterns might are also adequate for this Research Topic.


Keywords: Community Ecology, Landscape Ecology, Biogeography, ecological networks, habitat fragmentation, biotic interactions


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Both Landscape and Community Ecology have followed on parallel, non-intersecting, paths with Biogeography. Different scales of analysis separate these branches of Ecology. But can processes occurring at local to regional scales affect patterns manifested at biogeographical scales? Earlier research suggested that biotic interactions have no noticeable effect on species distributions at wider scales, but recent studies are challenging this view. Can biotic interactions, which occur at local scales, exhibit global patterns? Similarly, the effects of habitat modification are also starting to be considered relevant at biogeographical scales.

Either considering biotic interactions, habitat modification, or other local processes, nature does not discriminate scales, all are linked. It is the difficulty to integrate scales within conceptual and analytical frameworks that stands in the way of a unified approach to understanding biodiversity patterns across scales.

The goal of this Research Topic is to promote the development of innovative approaches to integrate ecological observations and analysis across spatial scales, with the aim of furthering knowledge about biodiversity patterns and processes and improving scientific insights going into conservation planning. In particular, we aim to address the gap between Community and Landscape Ecology and Biogeography. Manuscripts might address the following topics:
• To what extent are biotic interactions and habitat modification relevant in the context of range shifting species?
• In what conditions, if any, is the Eltonian Noise Hypothesis relevant?
• To what extent is the scale at which species explore the habitats relevant?
• Are there consistent empirical evidence for biogeographical patterns in ecological networks?

We welcome innovative ecological studies integrating multiple spatial scales of observation and analysis. Two main lines of inquiry are particularly encouraged: a) effects of biotic interactions across scales and their effect on the distribution of species at biogeographical scales b) the effects of habitat modification (either loss or fragmentation) on species current and future ranges across scales.

These are general categories, allowing for a wide variety of studies to be included in the Research Topic. However, manuscripts addressing other questions while integrating multiple scales in the analysis of biodiversity patterns might are also adequate for this Research Topic.


Keywords: Community Ecology, Landscape Ecology, Biogeography, ecological networks, habitat fragmentation, biotic interactions


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 December 2021 Abstract
15 April 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 December 2021 Abstract
15 April 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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