Research Topic

Near-earth Electromagnetic Environment and Natural Hazards Disturbances

About this Research Topic

Natural hazards, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis, have threatened human communities throughout recorded history. Scientists still face a long-term challenge to reveal the natural hazards' preparation process and precisely predict their occurrences. With space technology development, in the early 1980s, some satellites recorded abnormal electromagnetic emissions, plasma density irregularities, and energetic particle precipitations over active seismic fault zones, volcanic belts, or tsunamis coast. Since then, continuous efforts have been paid to the rock-rupture-processing experiment, ground-space comparative studies. Especially for earthquake science, the electromagnetic precursors might be the most promising tool for the short-term (timescale of hours, days, and weeks) earthquake prediction. In late 2004, France launched the DEMETER (Detection of Electromagnetic (EM) Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite, which successfully operated from 2004 to 2010. In Febr. 2018, China launched the first seismo-electromagnetism satellite (China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite, CSES) aimed for earthquake monitoring from space.

At present, there are plenty of satellites (e.g., DMSP, NOAA, Swarm, CSES, FORMOSAT, COSMIC, etc.) operating in the near-earth space, which are recording electromagnetic and plasma data for both space environment and natural hazard monitoring. This Research Topic, on the one hand, aims to validate or calibrate the data from different instruments and satellite platforms to explore the near-space electromagnetic environment (EM field and waves, plasma parameters, energetic particle flux and distributions etc.). On the other hand, it focuses on natural hazard monitoring in terms of cross-disciplinary studies of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, and hurricanes/typhoons. From both modeling and observational points of view, we expect to find a new way to study natural hazards phenomena and coupling mechanisms of the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere.

This Research Topic aims to take full advantage of current operating electromagnetism and other related remote sensing satellites (e.g., infrared, hyperspectral, GNSS, etc.), to monitor and predict natural hazards by presenting the latest results from cross-disciplinary observations from both space and ground measurements. Besides observations analysis, mechanism modeling, the special issue also collects the related data validation/calibration studies to highlight the state-of-the-art of space observation technology.

We are looking for contributions that include, but are not limited to:
• Data processing, validation, and evaluation methods of measurements (including the electromagnetic satellite, GNSS/Radar, Infrared/Hyperspectral satellite)
• Case and statistical observations analysis on natural hazards from multi-source data
• Theory, modeling on electromagnetic and thermodynamic effects during the occurrences of natural hazards
• Latest developments in the predictability of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, and typhoons based on both ground and space stereoscopic monitoring
• New instruments, missions and tools to monitor the ionosphere


Keywords: Electromagnetism satellite observations, data calibration/validation, natural hazards monitoring, earthquakes, tsunami, volcano, space weather effects, seismic ionospheric disturbance


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Natural hazards, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis, have threatened human communities throughout recorded history. Scientists still face a long-term challenge to reveal the natural hazards' preparation process and precisely predict their occurrences. With space technology development, in the early 1980s, some satellites recorded abnormal electromagnetic emissions, plasma density irregularities, and energetic particle precipitations over active seismic fault zones, volcanic belts, or tsunamis coast. Since then, continuous efforts have been paid to the rock-rupture-processing experiment, ground-space comparative studies. Especially for earthquake science, the electromagnetic precursors might be the most promising tool for the short-term (timescale of hours, days, and weeks) earthquake prediction. In late 2004, France launched the DEMETER (Detection of Electromagnetic (EM) Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite, which successfully operated from 2004 to 2010. In Febr. 2018, China launched the first seismo-electromagnetism satellite (China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite, CSES) aimed for earthquake monitoring from space.

At present, there are plenty of satellites (e.g., DMSP, NOAA, Swarm, CSES, FORMOSAT, COSMIC, etc.) operating in the near-earth space, which are recording electromagnetic and plasma data for both space environment and natural hazard monitoring. This Research Topic, on the one hand, aims to validate or calibrate the data from different instruments and satellite platforms to explore the near-space electromagnetic environment (EM field and waves, plasma parameters, energetic particle flux and distributions etc.). On the other hand, it focuses on natural hazard monitoring in terms of cross-disciplinary studies of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, and hurricanes/typhoons. From both modeling and observational points of view, we expect to find a new way to study natural hazards phenomena and coupling mechanisms of the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere.

This Research Topic aims to take full advantage of current operating electromagnetism and other related remote sensing satellites (e.g., infrared, hyperspectral, GNSS, etc.), to monitor and predict natural hazards by presenting the latest results from cross-disciplinary observations from both space and ground measurements. Besides observations analysis, mechanism modeling, the special issue also collects the related data validation/calibration studies to highlight the state-of-the-art of space observation technology.

We are looking for contributions that include, but are not limited to:
• Data processing, validation, and evaluation methods of measurements (including the electromagnetic satellite, GNSS/Radar, Infrared/Hyperspectral satellite)
• Case and statistical observations analysis on natural hazards from multi-source data
• Theory, modeling on electromagnetic and thermodynamic effects during the occurrences of natural hazards
• Latest developments in the predictability of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, and typhoons based on both ground and space stereoscopic monitoring
• New instruments, missions and tools to monitor the ionosphere


Keywords: Electromagnetism satellite observations, data calibration/validation, natural hazards monitoring, earthquakes, tsunami, volcano, space weather effects, seismic ionospheric disturbance


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2022 Abstract
31 May 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2022 Abstract
31 May 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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