Research Topic

Glanders and Melioidosis: One Health Model

About this Research Topic

Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are closely related gram-negative bacteria that can cause fatal infections in humans and animals as melioidosis and glanders respectively. B. pseudomallei is an environmental saprophyte and is mainly transmitted to humans through inhalation or cutaneous inoculation, whereas B. mallei is an obligate mammalian pathogen and primarily affects solipeds (horses, mules, and donkeys). Melioidosis symptoms are similar to those described for glanders, although it can also be acquired by the gastrointestinal route. Both species are classified as Tier 1 Select Agents by the US Federal Select Agent Program because of their biothreat potential and intrinsic characteristics. Whole-genome comparisons suggest that B. mallei probably evolved through genome downsizing from a single clone of B. pseudomallei. It is imperative to know more about these two closely related organisms that cause serious life-threatening diseases, and have biothreat potential.

Melioidosis and glanders are still not even considered as ‘Neglected Tropical Disease, though they are documented in humans and animals from almost every continent. One of the major reasons for remaining neglected is the lack of awareness about these two fatal diseases among the diagnosticians, treating doctors, public health personnel, and policymakers. A recent modeling study suggests that melioidosis kills more people worldwide every year than the diseases that are better know, such as leptospirosis and dengue. In animals, the disease has been eradicated in developed countries through testing and import restrictions. However, glanders remains sporadically reported in a number of Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and South American countries.

This Research Topic will help identify these two potentially lethal tropical diseases, raise awareness and guide potential approaches in addressing them with One Health model. The aim is to collect original research, perspective, and full and mini-review articles relevant to the latest advances in glanders and melioidosis.

Specific interest of the Research Topic should include both veterinary and human aspects of the disease:
- Glanders and Melioidosis in veterinary science and treatment/ cost of the disease in animals
- One Health surveillance approaches for glanders and melioidosis
- Host-pathogen interactions and immunity to infections
- Molecular epidemiology, diagnosis, vaccine and drug development
- Novel insights on the genomics, proteomics and virulence
- Policy/guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, control and preventive measures to combat glanders and melioidosis


Keywords: Glanders, Melioidosis, Diagnosis, Surveillance, immune responses, Vaccine


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are closely related gram-negative bacteria that can cause fatal infections in humans and animals as melioidosis and glanders respectively. B. pseudomallei is an environmental saprophyte and is mainly transmitted to humans through inhalation or cutaneous inoculation, whereas B. mallei is an obligate mammalian pathogen and primarily affects solipeds (horses, mules, and donkeys). Melioidosis symptoms are similar to those described for glanders, although it can also be acquired by the gastrointestinal route. Both species are classified as Tier 1 Select Agents by the US Federal Select Agent Program because of their biothreat potential and intrinsic characteristics. Whole-genome comparisons suggest that B. mallei probably evolved through genome downsizing from a single clone of B. pseudomallei. It is imperative to know more about these two closely related organisms that cause serious life-threatening diseases, and have biothreat potential.

Melioidosis and glanders are still not even considered as ‘Neglected Tropical Disease, though they are documented in humans and animals from almost every continent. One of the major reasons for remaining neglected is the lack of awareness about these two fatal diseases among the diagnosticians, treating doctors, public health personnel, and policymakers. A recent modeling study suggests that melioidosis kills more people worldwide every year than the diseases that are better know, such as leptospirosis and dengue. In animals, the disease has been eradicated in developed countries through testing and import restrictions. However, glanders remains sporadically reported in a number of Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and South American countries.

This Research Topic will help identify these two potentially lethal tropical diseases, raise awareness and guide potential approaches in addressing them with One Health model. The aim is to collect original research, perspective, and full and mini-review articles relevant to the latest advances in glanders and melioidosis.

Specific interest of the Research Topic should include both veterinary and human aspects of the disease:
- Glanders and Melioidosis in veterinary science and treatment/ cost of the disease in animals
- One Health surveillance approaches for glanders and melioidosis
- Host-pathogen interactions and immunity to infections
- Molecular epidemiology, diagnosis, vaccine and drug development
- Novel insights on the genomics, proteomics and virulence
- Policy/guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, control and preventive measures to combat glanders and melioidosis


Keywords: Glanders, Melioidosis, Diagnosis, Surveillance, immune responses, Vaccine


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2021 Abstract
28 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2021 Abstract
28 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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