Research Topic

The Psychology and Education of Entrepreneurial Development

About this Research Topic

Entrepreneurship education has seen worldwide exponential growth in a variety of contexts, but especially in higher education institutions over the last decade. Nowadays, entrepreneurship education has expanded beyond management education as it is often connected to innovation education in the disciplines of engineering and technology. How to nurture the talents of different professions to become successful entrepreneurs has become a hot, yet critical, issue in the research and practice of management and educational fields.

According to the OECD report compiled by Lackéus in 2015, “Entrepreneurship in Education: What, Why, When, How”, the terminology of entrepreneurship in education and entrepreneurial education as proposed by Erkkilä in 2000 is encompassing both enterprise and entrepreneurship education. Lackéus further elaborated with three approaches including teaching “about”, teaching “for”, and teaching “through” entrepreneurship. Underpinning all of these approaches to contemporary entrepreneurship education research is the need to understand the psychological nature and development of the individual entrepreneur.

Previous psychological studies have examined psychological constructs used in entrepreneurship including personality and social factors, cognitive factors such as abilities and strategies, and affective factors like motivation and emotion. However, how to expand these constructs of theoretical entrepreneurship research in order to highlight the complexity, and intersectionality, of these psychological constructs for entrepreneurial diversity, and its contexts of all levels, needs further exploration and investigation.

Therefore, the goal of this Research Topic is to encourage new understandings of entrepreneurial education from interdisciplinary psychological perspectives. We welcome empirical and theoretical articles, perspectives and review papers that engage with any of the following (or related) areas of interest, though we also welcome areas that are not included below:

• Personality factors in entrepreneurial development
• Need for achievement, loss of control, autonomy, self-efficacy, innovativeness, stress tolerance, risk taking
• Cognitive factors in entrepreneurial development
• General and specific knowledge, management ability and business strategy, entrepreneurial orientation
• Social factors in entrepreneurial development
• Social networking, resources seeking, human and social capitals identification, gender, self and social identity
• Affective factors in entrepreneurial development
• Passion, affect, emotion, entrepreneurial orientation
• Advancing concepts and models for measuring entrepreneurial intention
• Curriculum and instruction in entrepreneurial education
• Career choice and entrepreneurial education
• Social innovation and entrepreneurial education
• Technology innovation and entrepreneurial education
• Entrepreneurial education in different professions
• Leadership and entrepreneurial development
• Policy Study and entrepreneurial development
• Cross-cultural, inter-cultural, and trans-cultural issues of entrepreneurial development
• Entrepreneurial way of life


Keywords: Psychology of Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship in Education, Entrepreneurial Education, Entrepreneurial Development


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Entrepreneurship education has seen worldwide exponential growth in a variety of contexts, but especially in higher education institutions over the last decade. Nowadays, entrepreneurship education has expanded beyond management education as it is often connected to innovation education in the disciplines of engineering and technology. How to nurture the talents of different professions to become successful entrepreneurs has become a hot, yet critical, issue in the research and practice of management and educational fields.

According to the OECD report compiled by Lackéus in 2015, “Entrepreneurship in Education: What, Why, When, How”, the terminology of entrepreneurship in education and entrepreneurial education as proposed by Erkkilä in 2000 is encompassing both enterprise and entrepreneurship education. Lackéus further elaborated with three approaches including teaching “about”, teaching “for”, and teaching “through” entrepreneurship. Underpinning all of these approaches to contemporary entrepreneurship education research is the need to understand the psychological nature and development of the individual entrepreneur.

Previous psychological studies have examined psychological constructs used in entrepreneurship including personality and social factors, cognitive factors such as abilities and strategies, and affective factors like motivation and emotion. However, how to expand these constructs of theoretical entrepreneurship research in order to highlight the complexity, and intersectionality, of these psychological constructs for entrepreneurial diversity, and its contexts of all levels, needs further exploration and investigation.

Therefore, the goal of this Research Topic is to encourage new understandings of entrepreneurial education from interdisciplinary psychological perspectives. We welcome empirical and theoretical articles, perspectives and review papers that engage with any of the following (or related) areas of interest, though we also welcome areas that are not included below:

• Personality factors in entrepreneurial development
• Need for achievement, loss of control, autonomy, self-efficacy, innovativeness, stress tolerance, risk taking
• Cognitive factors in entrepreneurial development
• General and specific knowledge, management ability and business strategy, entrepreneurial orientation
• Social factors in entrepreneurial development
• Social networking, resources seeking, human and social capitals identification, gender, self and social identity
• Affective factors in entrepreneurial development
• Passion, affect, emotion, entrepreneurial orientation
• Advancing concepts and models for measuring entrepreneurial intention
• Curriculum and instruction in entrepreneurial education
• Career choice and entrepreneurial education
• Social innovation and entrepreneurial education
• Technology innovation and entrepreneurial education
• Entrepreneurial education in different professions
• Leadership and entrepreneurial development
• Policy Study and entrepreneurial development
• Cross-cultural, inter-cultural, and trans-cultural issues of entrepreneurial development
• Entrepreneurial way of life


Keywords: Psychology of Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship in Education, Entrepreneurial Education, Entrepreneurial Development


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2018 Abstract
31 January 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2018 Abstract
31 January 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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