Research Topic

Exploring Plant Rhizosphere, Phyllosphere and Endosphere Microbial Communities to Improve the Management of Polluted Sites

About this Research Topic

Soils are an important resource, which however are subject to pollution by various chemicals, such as trace metals, petroleum hydrocarbons and xenobiotics. Plant microbial communities are inherent to plants' adaptation to their changing environment, while plants provide organic fuels for microbial functioning. PGPM, such as plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), ectomycorrhizal and endomycorrhizal fungi (EMF and AMF) are key players in this context and have been shown to promote pollutant degradation or containment in plant leaves or roots. New developments of "omics" tools are increasingly contributing to the understanding of the mechanisms and processes involved in plant-microbe interactions. However, these intimate relationships may be profoundly modified in polluted environments, and using PGPM in these degraded environments as nature-based solutions is a real challenge.

The goal of this Research Topic is to explore and better understand the complex interactions between pollutants, soil, plant roots and leaves, and microorganisms, providing an appropriate platform to disseminate recent results in this research area. Plant growth promoting microorganisms (PGPM) are considered as environmentally friendly useful microbes. However, the potential of emerging microbes such as phyllosphere yeasts of dark septate endophytes remain to be explored. It is also crucial to elucidate whether the microbial machineries that allow microbes to degrade or contain pollutants are fully expressed under interactions with their plant host, and how the processes involved may be better exploited in the revitalization or remediation of polluted soils.

This Research Topic welcomes contributions dealing with microbial communities from the rhizosphere, the endopshere and the phyllosphere of plants growing on polluted soils. We wish to explore the potential of using plants and their associated microorganisms for the revitalization or remediation of polluted soils and groundwater. The following article types are particularly welcomed: Original Research, Reviews, and Opinions. Manuscripts should address a clear hypothesis. Genome Announcement, Data Report, Case Report, and purely descriptive studies will not be considered. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
• screening microbial communities in plants’ rhizosphere and/or phyllosphere growing in polluted environments using multi-omic approaches
• elucidating mechanisms and processes underlying plant-microbe interactions in polluted environments
• exploring the potential of PGPM to degrade or contain pollutants by exploring microbial genomes and identifying relevant genes and proteins
• engineering microbial consortia to improve plant-based revitalization or remediation of polluted soils


Keywords: polluted environments, plant microbe interactions, bioremediation, "omics"


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Soils are an important resource, which however are subject to pollution by various chemicals, such as trace metals, petroleum hydrocarbons and xenobiotics. Plant microbial communities are inherent to plants' adaptation to their changing environment, while plants provide organic fuels for microbial functioning. PGPM, such as plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), ectomycorrhizal and endomycorrhizal fungi (EMF and AMF) are key players in this context and have been shown to promote pollutant degradation or containment in plant leaves or roots. New developments of "omics" tools are increasingly contributing to the understanding of the mechanisms and processes involved in plant-microbe interactions. However, these intimate relationships may be profoundly modified in polluted environments, and using PGPM in these degraded environments as nature-based solutions is a real challenge.

The goal of this Research Topic is to explore and better understand the complex interactions between pollutants, soil, plant roots and leaves, and microorganisms, providing an appropriate platform to disseminate recent results in this research area. Plant growth promoting microorganisms (PGPM) are considered as environmentally friendly useful microbes. However, the potential of emerging microbes such as phyllosphere yeasts of dark septate endophytes remain to be explored. It is also crucial to elucidate whether the microbial machineries that allow microbes to degrade or contain pollutants are fully expressed under interactions with their plant host, and how the processes involved may be better exploited in the revitalization or remediation of polluted soils.

This Research Topic welcomes contributions dealing with microbial communities from the rhizosphere, the endopshere and the phyllosphere of plants growing on polluted soils. We wish to explore the potential of using plants and their associated microorganisms for the revitalization or remediation of polluted soils and groundwater. The following article types are particularly welcomed: Original Research, Reviews, and Opinions. Manuscripts should address a clear hypothesis. Genome Announcement, Data Report, Case Report, and purely descriptive studies will not be considered. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
• screening microbial communities in plants’ rhizosphere and/or phyllosphere growing in polluted environments using multi-omic approaches
• elucidating mechanisms and processes underlying plant-microbe interactions in polluted environments
• exploring the potential of PGPM to degrade or contain pollutants by exploring microbial genomes and identifying relevant genes and proteins
• engineering microbial consortia to improve plant-based revitalization or remediation of polluted soils


Keywords: polluted environments, plant microbe interactions, bioremediation, "omics"


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

03 August 2020 Abstract
30 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

03 August 2020 Abstract
30 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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