Research Topic

Geospace Observation of Natural Hazards

About this Research Topic

With the launch of the first Low Earth Orbital (LEO) satellites (Earth Resources and Technology Satellites (ERTS) now Landsat satellites), there have been efforts to study natural hazards (NH) from space. This topic expands the discussions of assessing natural hazards with geospace observations by presenting the latest results from cross-disciplinary studies of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, and hurricanes/typhoons. It advances existing interdisciplinary studies of lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling processes due to significant natural hazards.

This collection will feature a multi-instrumental approach by using observations from the ground, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), Low Earth Orbiting Electromagnetic (LEO EM) satellites, along with Earth Observations (EO), which could reveal new information about the Earth’s processes. Data from LEO satellites can provide a global view of near-Earth space variability and are complementary to ground-based observations that are limited in global coverage. These observations extend the heritage of the DEMETER (CNES, 2004-2010) satellite mission, which was specifically designed for making measurements in the thermosphere-ionosphere to investigate ionospheric anomalies related to geohazards and space weather. We are taking advantage of the broad scope of observable electromagnetic activities by integrating ground-based observations and LEO satellites. Such EM activities like - thunderstorms, transient luminous events (TLEs), geomagnetism and space-weather can help in clarifying the missing scientific knowledge in studying the genesis and evolution of the large natural hazard events from space.

Results from the latest satellite missions, NPP/NASA/NOAA(US), CENTINEL, Swarm/ESA (EU), HIMAWARI (JMA, Japan), FORMOSAT-5 (Taiwan, August 2017), CSES1 (China/Italy, Feb 2018) and FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (Taiwan/USA, May 2019), will be presented. These satellite missions were designed to investigate atmospheric/ionospheric and space weather anomalies in the atmosphere-thermosphere-ionosphere. The availability of new global satellite data and models on the thermosphere/ionosphere interactions, demonstrate that satellites that have not been specifically designed for natural hazard studies can provide valuable contributions to this field. Such multi-instrumental observations could expand our knowledge of the geosphere’s interaction associated with natural hazards.

We are looking for contributions that include, but are not limited to:

• Multi-instrumental approach by using the ground, GNSS, LEO EM satellites, along with Earth Observations for from cross-disciplinary studies of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, and typhoons;
• Theory, modelling and observations on electromagnetic and thermodynamic effects in atmosphere/ionosphere associated with pre-earthquake processes;
• Interdisciplinary studies associated with lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling processes linked to natural hazards;
• Case histories relating geospace observations of natural hazards and space weather;
• Multi-parameter observations, validation and related cross-disciplinary studies of natural hazards;
• Practical, and technical approaches for monitoring of natural hazards from space;
• Latest developments in the predictability of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, and typhoons based on space technologies.


Keywords: geospace, natural hazards, satellite, earthquakes, tsunami


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

With the launch of the first Low Earth Orbital (LEO) satellites (Earth Resources and Technology Satellites (ERTS) now Landsat satellites), there have been efforts to study natural hazards (NH) from space. This topic expands the discussions of assessing natural hazards with geospace observations by presenting the latest results from cross-disciplinary studies of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, and hurricanes/typhoons. It advances existing interdisciplinary studies of lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling processes due to significant natural hazards.

This collection will feature a multi-instrumental approach by using observations from the ground, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), Low Earth Orbiting Electromagnetic (LEO EM) satellites, along with Earth Observations (EO), which could reveal new information about the Earth’s processes. Data from LEO satellites can provide a global view of near-Earth space variability and are complementary to ground-based observations that are limited in global coverage. These observations extend the heritage of the DEMETER (CNES, 2004-2010) satellite mission, which was specifically designed for making measurements in the thermosphere-ionosphere to investigate ionospheric anomalies related to geohazards and space weather. We are taking advantage of the broad scope of observable electromagnetic activities by integrating ground-based observations and LEO satellites. Such EM activities like - thunderstorms, transient luminous events (TLEs), geomagnetism and space-weather can help in clarifying the missing scientific knowledge in studying the genesis and evolution of the large natural hazard events from space.

Results from the latest satellite missions, NPP/NASA/NOAA(US), CENTINEL, Swarm/ESA (EU), HIMAWARI (JMA, Japan), FORMOSAT-5 (Taiwan, August 2017), CSES1 (China/Italy, Feb 2018) and FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (Taiwan/USA, May 2019), will be presented. These satellite missions were designed to investigate atmospheric/ionospheric and space weather anomalies in the atmosphere-thermosphere-ionosphere. The availability of new global satellite data and models on the thermosphere/ionosphere interactions, demonstrate that satellites that have not been specifically designed for natural hazard studies can provide valuable contributions to this field. Such multi-instrumental observations could expand our knowledge of the geosphere’s interaction associated with natural hazards.

We are looking for contributions that include, but are not limited to:

• Multi-instrumental approach by using the ground, GNSS, LEO EM satellites, along with Earth Observations for from cross-disciplinary studies of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, and typhoons;
• Theory, modelling and observations on electromagnetic and thermodynamic effects in atmosphere/ionosphere associated with pre-earthquake processes;
• Interdisciplinary studies associated with lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling processes linked to natural hazards;
• Case histories relating geospace observations of natural hazards and space weather;
• Multi-parameter observations, validation and related cross-disciplinary studies of natural hazards;
• Practical, and technical approaches for monitoring of natural hazards from space;
• Latest developments in the predictability of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, and typhoons based on space technologies.


Keywords: geospace, natural hazards, satellite, earthquakes, tsunami


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

26 July 2020 Abstract
26 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

26 July 2020 Abstract
26 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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