Research Topic

The Magnetic Structures and Their Role in The Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections

About this Research Topic

Observations of the solar atmosphere suggest that many Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) occur in conjunction with magnetic flux ropes that form around the polarity inversion line of the erupting region. However, in interplanetary space, many of the resulting (Interplanetary) CMEs, or ICMEs, show no clear "rope-like" signature.

The magnetic structures within CMEs continuously evolve upon leaving the Sun, but we don't have a good grasp of the degree of that evolution. Observations near the Sun and in interplanetary space both illustrate that there is a range of interactions between the various magnetic structures inside the CME. It is thought that these interactions play an important role in changing the magnetic topology of the CME in flight, and hence what we detect in interplanetary space. With this Research Topic, we aim to better understand the evolution of the flux ropes in flight.

This Research Topic is required to completely understand CME dynamics, ICME diagnostics, and space weather prediction as a result by asking the following question: How does the internal magnetic structure of a CME evolve in flight? We solicit publications focused on understanding the character of magnetic structures within CMEs and characterizing their evolution as they move out into the heliosphere. Since interactions from inside and outside of the erupting magnetic structure should be studied to understand the evolutionary mechanisms we encourage submissions utilizing multiple-point observations and/or numerical simulations to develop a broad perspective on the possible scenarios that arise.


Keywords: coronal mass ejections, magnetic structure, magnetic flux rope, interplanetary space, magnetic reconnection


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Observations of the solar atmosphere suggest that many Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) occur in conjunction with magnetic flux ropes that form around the polarity inversion line of the erupting region. However, in interplanetary space, many of the resulting (Interplanetary) CMEs, or ICMEs, show no clear "rope-like" signature.

The magnetic structures within CMEs continuously evolve upon leaving the Sun, but we don't have a good grasp of the degree of that evolution. Observations near the Sun and in interplanetary space both illustrate that there is a range of interactions between the various magnetic structures inside the CME. It is thought that these interactions play an important role in changing the magnetic topology of the CME in flight, and hence what we detect in interplanetary space. With this Research Topic, we aim to better understand the evolution of the flux ropes in flight.

This Research Topic is required to completely understand CME dynamics, ICME diagnostics, and space weather prediction as a result by asking the following question: How does the internal magnetic structure of a CME evolve in flight? We solicit publications focused on understanding the character of magnetic structures within CMEs and characterizing their evolution as they move out into the heliosphere. Since interactions from inside and outside of the erupting magnetic structure should be studied to understand the evolutionary mechanisms we encourage submissions utilizing multiple-point observations and/or numerical simulations to develop a broad perspective on the possible scenarios that arise.


Keywords: coronal mass ejections, magnetic structure, magnetic flux rope, interplanetary space, magnetic reconnection


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 January 2021 Abstract
15 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 January 2021 Abstract
15 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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