Research Topic

Emerging and Re-Emerging Organizational Features, Work Transitions and Occupational Risk Factors: The Good, the Bad, the Right. An Interdisciplinary Perspective.

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The labor market is evolving very rapidly in recent years, in Europe and worldwide. The fast and deep changes brought a brand-new context of challenges and occupational risks to the attention of stakeholders. The current global financial crisis has increased the economic pressures on companies and they in ...

The labor market is evolving very rapidly in recent years, in Europe and worldwide. The fast and deep changes brought a brand-new context of challenges and occupational risks to the attention of stakeholders. The current global financial crisis has increased the economic pressures on companies and they in turn have intensified the effects on employees, particularly in terms of new competition contexts and a lot of stress and mental health issues.

Concurrently, social, political, and environmental problems generate under-employment, over-qualification, over-education, low wages for skilled workers, and unmet demand for education. Consequently, both high skilled and low skilled immigrant workers are increasing. In addition, workplaces are continually changing in step with the introduction of new technologies, materials, and work processes, together with the changes in the labor market, the new forms of employment, and the new work organizations. These changes lead to new opportunities for employees and employers – but also to new risks or re-actualization of old organizational risks.

According to the EU-OSHA, the key points that describe the evolution that is currently ongoing in the world of work are globalization, the technical innovation, and the aging population. On one hand, some older potential risks are reappearing in organizations: intensive fear and worries, organizational anxiety, boredom, physical violence, alienation, segregation, loneliness, and isolation. On the other hand, re-emerging perceived organizational features seem vital for organizations and more important today than ever. Central constructs in the study of organizational behavior and organizational health such as perceived organizational support, commitment in organizational context, socialization processes, change capacity of organizations, perceived organizational justice, ergonomics, and motivation, nowadays seem increasingly important and renewed.

We are particularly interested in manuscripts that offer a general welfare of employees and society perspectives on a number of important topics. We encourage a focus on how time and social, political, economic, and environmental issues may change our knowledge on organizational features, work transitions, and occupational risk factors. Indeed, emergence and reemergence are accelerated by rapid workers and organizational transformations, including numerous changes in demographics, society, and the environment.

Main themes:
• Emerging and re-emerging organizational features and occupational risk factors.
• The connection between economical, societal and environmental issues with occupational psychology and medicine.
• Assessment and prevention of risks arising from shift- and night-work.
• Assessment and prevention of psychosocial risks and work-related stress, highlighting economic, social, ethical, and ecological dimensions.
• Assessment and prevention of counterproductive workplace behaviors and negative behaviors (workplace bullying).
• Ergonomics and smart working.
• Migration and employment.
• Career obstacles, potentialities, and challenges.
• Organizational health and organizational relationality (e.g., from prosocial organizational behavior, organizational citizenship behavior, organizational support, workplace civility, organizational justice, ethical, sustainable, and servant leadership, organizational emotional intelligence to productive engagement, etc.).
• The linkage between justice and fairness with life work transitions.
• Commitment, values, and organizational identification.
• Transition and workplace: from organizational change, socialization, and innovation to the impact in working environments.
• Issues related to the evaluation of specific interventions for fostering strength and decreasing occupational risk factors.


Keywords: organizational psychology, occupational medicine, health, organizational risks, stress, innovation, anxiety, change, immigrants workers, counselling, organizational boredom, isolation in workplace, violence, commitment, engagement, welfare, organizational justice


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