Research Topic

El Niño-Southern Oscillation on a Changing Planet: Consequences for Coastal Ecosystems

About this Research Topic

With its warm (El Niño) and cold (La Niña) phases and its strong connection with the atmosphere through the Southern Oscillation pressure system, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) represents the largest signal in the interannual ocean/climate variation. The term, El Niño (“the boy child”, used by Peruvian fishermen to describe a Christmas-time warming of the sea surface), was first considered a climatic phenomenon restricted to the coastal zone of the Eastern Pacific. However, in the last 50 years, scientists have described nearly global effects in weather conditions and biotic systems connected with the ENSO cycle, including changes in rainfall patterns, the occurrence of droughts and storms, the incidence of epidemic diseases, and changes in the structure and function of marine ecosystems. These changes often have severe impacts on the world and local economies. Although the ENSO cycle has been present at least since the late Pliocene as an inherent component of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system, and despite our improved capacity to forecast it, the depiction of El Niño as a “phenomenon” prevails in mass media and the society at large. This research topic focuses on the advances in understanding ENSO and its consequences, particularly in American countries.


Keywords: Climate variability, coastal ecosystems, emerging diseases, biological impacts, marine ecology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

With its warm (El Niño) and cold (La Niña) phases and its strong connection with the atmosphere through the Southern Oscillation pressure system, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) represents the largest signal in the interannual ocean/climate variation. The term, El Niño (“the boy child”, used by Peruvian fishermen to describe a Christmas-time warming of the sea surface), was first considered a climatic phenomenon restricted to the coastal zone of the Eastern Pacific. However, in the last 50 years, scientists have described nearly global effects in weather conditions and biotic systems connected with the ENSO cycle, including changes in rainfall patterns, the occurrence of droughts and storms, the incidence of epidemic diseases, and changes in the structure and function of marine ecosystems. These changes often have severe impacts on the world and local economies. Although the ENSO cycle has been present at least since the late Pliocene as an inherent component of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system, and despite our improved capacity to forecast it, the depiction of El Niño as a “phenomenon” prevails in mass media and the society at large. This research topic focuses on the advances in understanding ENSO and its consequences, particularly in American countries.


Keywords: Climate variability, coastal ecosystems, emerging diseases, biological impacts, marine ecology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top