Research Topic

Bioadhesion

About this Research Topic

Materials and systems preventing the separation of two surfaces may be defined as adhesives. There are a variety of natural adhesive devices based on entirely mechanical principles, while others additionally rely on the chemistry of polymers and colloids. Adhesive organs are functional systems, the purpose of which is either temporary or permanent attachment of an organism to the substrate surface, to another organism, or temporary interconnection of body parts within an organism. Their design varies enormously and is subject to different functional loads. There is no doubt that many functional solutions have evolved independently in different lineages of organisms. Many species of animals and plants are supplied with diverse adhesive surfaces, the morphology of which depends on the species’ biology, and the particular function in which the adhesive device is involved.

There are numerous publications on cell adhesion phenomena, but much fewer references are devoted to the non-specific adhesion of living organisms. Because of the structural, mechanical and chemical complexity of biological surfaces related to adhesion, exact working mechanisms have been clarified only for some systems. In this Research Topic, we aim at collecting papers dealing with biological surfaces and systems specialized for adhesion enhancement. These contributions will discuss adhesive function of biological surfaces and their relationship with the structure, contact mechanics and chemistry of surfaces. Because of the diversity of functions in adhesion-related biological surfaces, biology could provide interesting inspirations for a broad range of topics in physics, chemistry, and engineering.

• Fundamental classes of attachment principles in biology: (1) hooks, (2) lock or snap, (3) clamp, (4) spacer, (5) suction, (6) expansion anchor, (7) adhesive secretions (glue), and (8) friction
• Combinations of the above principles in functioning of some selected adhesive systems
• Temporary adhesion allowing an organism to attach strongly to the substrate and detach quickly when necessary
• Permanent adhesion involving the secretion of cement
• Biomimetic systems inspired by biology


Keywords: Biological Surfaces, Bioinspired Materials, Biomimetic Systems, Attachment, Detachment


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Materials and systems preventing the separation of two surfaces may be defined as adhesives. There are a variety of natural adhesive devices based on entirely mechanical principles, while others additionally rely on the chemistry of polymers and colloids. Adhesive organs are functional systems, the purpose of which is either temporary or permanent attachment of an organism to the substrate surface, to another organism, or temporary interconnection of body parts within an organism. Their design varies enormously and is subject to different functional loads. There is no doubt that many functional solutions have evolved independently in different lineages of organisms. Many species of animals and plants are supplied with diverse adhesive surfaces, the morphology of which depends on the species’ biology, and the particular function in which the adhesive device is involved.

There are numerous publications on cell adhesion phenomena, but much fewer references are devoted to the non-specific adhesion of living organisms. Because of the structural, mechanical and chemical complexity of biological surfaces related to adhesion, exact working mechanisms have been clarified only for some systems. In this Research Topic, we aim at collecting papers dealing with biological surfaces and systems specialized for adhesion enhancement. These contributions will discuss adhesive function of biological surfaces and their relationship with the structure, contact mechanics and chemistry of surfaces. Because of the diversity of functions in adhesion-related biological surfaces, biology could provide interesting inspirations for a broad range of topics in physics, chemistry, and engineering.

• Fundamental classes of attachment principles in biology: (1) hooks, (2) lock or snap, (3) clamp, (4) spacer, (5) suction, (6) expansion anchor, (7) adhesive secretions (glue), and (8) friction
• Combinations of the above principles in functioning of some selected adhesive systems
• Temporary adhesion allowing an organism to attach strongly to the substrate and detach quickly when necessary
• Permanent adhesion involving the secretion of cement
• Biomimetic systems inspired by biology


Keywords: Biological Surfaces, Bioinspired Materials, Biomimetic Systems, Attachment, Detachment


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

01 September 2020 Abstract
01 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 September 2020 Abstract
01 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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