About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 31 August 2022
Manuscript Extension Submission Deadline 09 September 2022

Since its launch in 2013, IRIS has observed more than 10 X-class, over 100 M-class and more than 600 C-class flares at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution.

Thanks to the rich diagnostics that cover the physical conditions of the solar atmosphere from the photosphere to the hottest parts of the flaring corona, IRIS observations have provided exciting new results and constraints on flare heating models, significantly expanding our knowledge of how flares are triggered, and how the non-thermal energy is released, propagates downward from the corona, and is deposited in the low atmosphere.

At the same time, the new discoveries provided by IRIS have raised new unresolved questions and new challenges for theoretical models. For instance, current hydrodynamic models still cannot fully explain many features observed by IRIS during both the impulsive and gradual phases such as the dynamics of the evaporative/condensation flows, the large line broadenings, and the puzzling complex and broad chromospheric lines. In addition, important questions remain regarding the details of the energy propagation and dissipation in flares, the importance of Alfvén waves vs electron-beam and thermal conduction heating, and the effects from large-scale reconfiguration of the magnetic field during flares.

The goals of this Research Topic are to: (1) highlight the IRIS’s unique contribution to our understanding of flares and in particular how the state-of-the-art heating models of flares are constrained by the IRIS rich spectral diagnostics; (2) outline the path forward to solve some of these outstanding problems by combining IRIS observations, also in coordination with recent ground and space-based observatories such as DKIST, SST, BBSO, Solar Orbiter, and PSP, and modeling; (3) discuss how new observational analysis techniques such as machine learning can be applied to the IRIS data to provide new insights into flare trigger and heating mechanisms, and to move data analysis beyond single-event approaches, enabling a broader view of the dominant mechanisms. To achieve these goals, our Research Topic will include both short review articles and original work.

Keywords: Sun, Flares, UV, space weather, particle acceleration, IRIS


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Since its launch in 2013, IRIS has observed more than 10 X-class, over 100 M-class and more than 600 C-class flares at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution.

Thanks to the rich diagnostics that cover the physical conditions of the solar atmosphere from the photosphere to the hottest parts of the flaring corona, IRIS observations have provided exciting new results and constraints on flare heating models, significantly expanding our knowledge of how flares are triggered, and how the non-thermal energy is released, propagates downward from the corona, and is deposited in the low atmosphere.

At the same time, the new discoveries provided by IRIS have raised new unresolved questions and new challenges for theoretical models. For instance, current hydrodynamic models still cannot fully explain many features observed by IRIS during both the impulsive and gradual phases such as the dynamics of the evaporative/condensation flows, the large line broadenings, and the puzzling complex and broad chromospheric lines. In addition, important questions remain regarding the details of the energy propagation and dissipation in flares, the importance of Alfvén waves vs electron-beam and thermal conduction heating, and the effects from large-scale reconfiguration of the magnetic field during flares.

The goals of this Research Topic are to: (1) highlight the IRIS’s unique contribution to our understanding of flares and in particular how the state-of-the-art heating models of flares are constrained by the IRIS rich spectral diagnostics; (2) outline the path forward to solve some of these outstanding problems by combining IRIS observations, also in coordination with recent ground and space-based observatories such as DKIST, SST, BBSO, Solar Orbiter, and PSP, and modeling; (3) discuss how new observational analysis techniques such as machine learning can be applied to the IRIS data to provide new insights into flare trigger and heating mechanisms, and to move data analysis beyond single-event approaches, enabling a broader view of the dominant mechanisms. To achieve these goals, our Research Topic will include both short review articles and original work.

Keywords: Sun, Flares, UV, space weather, particle acceleration, IRIS


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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