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Original Research ARTICLE

Front. Hum. Dyn. | doi: 10.3389/fhumd.2021.606871

COVID-19 & Immigrants’ Increased Exclusion: The Politics of Immigrant Integration in Chile and Peru Provisionally accepted The final, formatted version of the article will be published soon. Notify me

  • 1University of the Pacific (Peru), Peru
  • 2Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom

The COVID-19 sanitary crisis has put into sharp relief the need for socio-economic integration of migrants, regardless of their migratory condition. In South America, more than five million Venezuelan citizens have been forced to migrate across the region in the past five years. Alongside other intra-regional migrants and refugees, many find themselves in precarious legal and socio-economic conditions, as the surge in numbers has led to xenophobic backlashes in some of the main receiving countries, including Chile and Peru. In this Perspective, we will explore in how far the COVID-19 crisis has offered stakeholders an opportunity to politically reframe migration and facilitate immigrant integration or, rather, further propelled xenophobic sentiments and the socio-economic and legal exclusion of immigrants.

Keywords: COVID-19, South America, Venezuelan Displacement, Immigrant integration, Immigrant exclusion, Xenophobia

Received: 05 Dec 2020; Accepted: 28 Jan 2021.

Copyright: © 2021 Freier and Vera Espinoza. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
Dr. Luisa F. Freier, University of the Pacific (Peru), Lima, Peru, lf.freierd@up.edu.pe
Dr. Marcia Vera Espinoza, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS, United Kingdom, m.vera-espinoza@qmul.ac.uk