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REVIEW article

Front. Med. | doi: 10.3389/fmed.2021.676538

Risk-taking behaviors of adult bedridden patients in neurosurgery: what could-should we do ? Provisionally accepted The final, formatted version of the article will be published soon. Notify me

 Jean-Jacques Lemaire1, 2*,  Rémi Chaix1, 2, Anna Sontheimer1, 2,  Jérôme Coste1, 2, Marie-Anne Cousseau3, Charlène Dubois2, Mélanie San Juan2, Christelle Massa2, Sandrine Raynaud2, Alexandra Usclade4, Bénédicte Pontier1, 2, Youssef El Ouadih1, 2,  Kamel Abdelouahab5,  Lucas Maggiani5 and François Berry1*
  • 1UMR6602 Institut Pascal (IP), France
  • 2Service de Neurochirurgie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand, France
  • 3Direction de la Recherche et de l’Innovation, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand, France
  • 4Direction de la Recherche et de l'Innovation, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand, France
  • 5Sma-RTy SAS, France

Risk-taking behaviors of adult bedridden patients in neurosurgery are frequent, however little analyzed. We aimed to estimate from the literature and our clinical experience the incidence of the different clinical pictures. Risk-taking behaviors seem to be more frequent than reported. They are often minor, but they can lead to death, irrespectively of the prescription of physical or chemical constraints. We also aimed to contextualize the risks, and to describe the means reducing the consequences for the patients. Two main conditions were identified, the loss of awareness of risk-taking behaviors by the patient, and uncontrolled body motions. Besides current experience feedback analyses and new technological solutions, non exclusive, could limit the complications, while improving the prevention with wearable systems, neighborhood sensors or room monitoring and service robots. Further research is mandatory to develop efficient and reliable systems avoiding complications and saving lives. Ethical and legal issues must also be accounted, notably concerning the privacy of patients and caregivers.

Keywords: Risk-taking behaviors, Monitoring, Bedridden, Neurosurgery, risk

Received: 15 Mar 2021; Accepted: 08 Jun 2021.

Copyright: © 2021 Lemaire, Chaix, Sontheimer, Coste, Cousseau, Dubois, San Juan, Massa, Raynaud, Usclade, Pontier, El Ouadih, Abdelouahab, Maggiani and Berry. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
Prof. Jean-Jacques Lemaire, UMR6602 Institut Pascal (IP), Aubière, 63177, Auvergne, France, jeanjacques.lemaire@gmail.com
Mr. François Berry, UMR6602 Institut Pascal (IP), Aubière, 63177, Auvergne, France, francois.berry@uca.fr