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Correction ARTICLE

Front. Hum. Neurosci., 02 June 2016 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2016.00253

Corrigendum: Barriers, Benefits, and Beliefs of Brain Training Smartphone Apps: An Internet Survey of Younger US Consumers

John Torous1*, Patrick Staples2, Elizabeth Fenstermacher1, Jason Dean1 and Matcheri Keshavan1
  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA
  • 2Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA

A corrigendum on
Barriers, Benefits, and Beliefs of Brain Training Smartphone Apps: An Internet Survey of Younger US Consumers

by Torous, J., Staples, P., Fenstermacher, E., Dean, J., and Keshavan, M. (2016). Front. Hum. Neurosci. 10:180. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00180

Reason for Corrigendum: Addition of conflict of interest statement by Dr. Matcheri Keshavam.

Clearly state the mistake being fixed.

After publication, Dr. Matcheri Keshavan noted the paper should include this statement “MK has a contract to purchase Lumosity services for one of his studies, and has provided consultant services to Forum Pharmaceuticals.”

Author Contributions

JT and MK conceived the research idea. JT, EF, and JD wrote the protocol and IRB. PS analyzed the data and produced all figures. JT, EF, JD, and MK conducted background literature review. All authors helped in the writing and drafting on this manuscript. All authors edited the manuscript.

Conflict of Interest Statement

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

MK has a contract to purchase Lumosity services for one of his studies, and has provided consultant services to Forum Pharmaceuticals.

Keywords: brain, apps, smartphones, memory, technology assessment

Citation: Torous J, Staples P, Fenstermacher E, Dean J and Keshavan M (2016) Corrigendum: Barriers, Benefits, and Beliefs of Brain Training Smartphone Apps: An Internet Survey of Younger US Consumers. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 10:253. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00253

Received: 02 May 2016; Accepted: 17 May 2016;
Published: 02 June 2016.

Edited and reviewed by: Soledad Ballesteros, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain

Copyright © 2016 Torous, Staples, Fenstermacher, Dean and Keshavan. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: John Torous, jtorous@bidmc.harvard.edu