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Correction ARTICLE

Front. Hum. Neurosci., 03 February 2017 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00053

Corrigendum: Does a Combination of Virtual Reality, Neuromodulation and Neuroimaging Provide a Comprehensive Platform for Neurorehabilitation? – A Narrative Review of the Literature

Wei-Peng Teo1*, Makii Muthalib2,3, Sami Yamin4,5, Ashlee M. Hendy6, Kelly Bramstedt4, Eleftheria Kotsopoulos4,7, Stephane Perrey2 and Hasan Ayaz8,9,10
  • 1Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), Deakin University, Burwood, VIC, Australia
  • 2EuroMov, University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France
  • 3Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC, Australia
  • 4Liminal Pty Ltd., Melbourne, VIC, Australia
  • 5Adult Mental Health, Monash Health, Dandenong, VIC, Australia
  • 6School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC, Australia
  • 7Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Monash Health, Cheltenham, VIC, Australia
  • 8School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
  • 9Department of Family and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
  • 10The Division of General Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

A corrigendum on
Does a Combination of Virtual Reality, Neuromodulation and Neuroimaging Provide a Comprehensive Platform for Neurorehabilitation? – A Narrative Review of the Literature

by Teo, W.-P., Muthalib, M., Yamin, S., Hendy, A. M., Bramstedt, K., Kotsopoulos, E., et al., (2016). Front. Hum. Neurosci. 10:284. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00284

In the original article, there was a mistake in the legend for Figure 2 as published. The correct legend appears below. The authors apologize for this error and state that this does not change the scientific conclusions of the article in any way.

Figure 2. Stroke participants engaged in VR therapy using an X-Box Kinect motion capture system, MediMoov by NaturalPad, while receiving tDCS.

Conflict of Interest Statement

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Keywords: neurorehabilitation, neuroplasticity, tDCS, fNIRS, EEG, virtual reality therapy

Citation: Teo W-P, Muthalib M, Yamin S, Hendy AM, Bramstedt K, Kotsopoulos E, Perrey S and Ayaz H (2017) Corrigendum: Does a Combination of Virtual Reality, Neuromodulation and Neuroimaging Provide a Comprehensive Platform for Neurorehabilitation? – A Narrative Review of the Literature. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 11:53. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00053

Received: 12 January 2017; Accepted: 24 January 2017;
Published: 03 February 2017.

Edited and reviewed by: Mikhail Lebedev, Duke University, USA

Copyright © 2017 Teo, Muthalib, Yamin, Hendy, Bramstedt, Kotsopoulos, Perrey and Ayaz. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Wei-Peng Teo, weipeng.teo@deakin.edu.au