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SIRT family in Endocrinology

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Front. Endocrinol. | doi: 10.3389/fendo.2018.00702

Brain SIRT1 mediates metabolic homeostasis and neuroprotection

  • 1Cerebral Vascular Disease Research Laboratories (CVDRL), Department of Neurology, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, United States
  • 2Department of Neurology, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, United States

Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved proteins that use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a co-substrate in their enzymatic reactions. There are seven proteins (SIRT1-7) in the human sirtuin family, among which SIRT1 is the most conserved and characterized. SIRT1 in the brain, in particular, within the hypothalamus, plays crucial roles in regulating systemic energy homeostasis and circadian rhythm. Apart from this, SIRT1 has also been found to mediate beneficial effects in neurological diseases. In this review, we will first summarize how SIRT1 in the brain relates to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and circadian synchronization, and then we discuss the neuroprotective roles of brain SIRT1 in the context of cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative disorders.

Keywords: SIRT1, Obesity, Type 2 diabete, Circadian rhtythms, Cerebral ischeima, Alzheimer's diasease, Parkinson ' s disease

Received: 17 Aug 2018; Accepted: 06 Nov 2018.

Edited by:

Yang Yang, Northwest University, China

Reviewed by:

Thierry Coppola, Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France
Chuang Wang, Ningbo University, China
Hee-Dae Kim, College of Medicine Phoenix, University of Arizona, United States  

Copyright: © 2018 Xu, Jackson, Khoury, Escobar and Perez-Pinzon. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence: Prof. Miguel A. Perez-Pinzon, Cerebral Vascular Disease Research Laboratories (CVDRL), Department of Neurology, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Miami, 33136, United States, perezpinzon@med.miami.edu