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Front. Immunol. | doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2019.02388

The role of TLRs in anti-cancer immunity and tumor rejection

  • 1International Centre for Cancer Vaccine Science, University of Gdańsk, Poland
  • 2Laboratory of Immune System Biology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH), United States
  • 3School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, United States
  • 4Department of Medical Biosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden
  • 5INSERM U1162 Génomique Fonctionnelle des Tumeurs Solides, France
  • 6Regional Centre for Applied Molecular Oncology, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Czechia
  • 7Laboratory of Immunoregulation and Cellular Therapies, Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of Gdańsk, Poland
  • 8Medical Research Council Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (MRC), United Kingdom
  • 9Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, United States

In recent years, a lot of scientific interest has focused on cancer immunotherapy. Although chronic inflammation has been described as one of the hallmarks of cancer, acute inflammation can actually trigger the immune system to fight diseases, including cancer. Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands have long been used as adjuvants for traditional vaccines and it seems they may also play a role enhancing efficiency of tumor immunotherapy. The aim of this perspective is to discuss the effects of TLR stimulation in cancer, expression of various TLRs in different types of tumors, and finally the role of TLRs in anti-cancer immunity and tumor rejection.

Keywords: Toll-Like Receptors, anti-cancer immunity, tumor rejection, immuno-oncology, Immunotherapy

Received: 12 Jul 2019; Accepted: 23 Sep 2019.

Copyright: © 2019 Urban-Wojciuk, Khan, Oyler, Fåhraeus, Marek- Trzonkowska, Nita-Lazar, Hupp and Goodlett. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
Dr. Aleksandra Nita-Lazar, Laboratory of Immune System Biology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, United States, nitalazarau@NIAID.NIH.GOV
Prof. Ted R. Hupp, International Centre for Cancer Vaccine Science, University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland, Ted.Hupp@ed.ac.uk
Prof. David R. Goodlett, International Centre for Cancer Vaccine Science, University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland, dgoodlett@rx.umaryland.edu