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General Commentary ARTICLE

Front. Aging Neurosci., 13 January 2015 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2014.00345

Corrigendum: Coping with brief periods of food restriction: mindfulness matters

  • 1Laboratory for Complex Brain Networks, Radiology Department, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USA
  • 2Translational Science Center, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC, USA
  • 3Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
  • 4Departments of Health and Exercise Science and Geriatric Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC, USA

A corrigendum on
Coping with brief periods of food restriction: mindfulness matters

by Paolini, B., Burdette, J. H., Laurienti, P. J., Morgan, A. R., Williamson, D. A., and Rejeski, W. J. (2012). Front. Aging Neurosci. 4:13. doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2012.00013

There is a minor error in the results section of the aforementioned publication. The current text on page 11, lines 340–344 reads:

Conversely, as shown in Figure 3, the low mindful group had the greatest global efficiency in the auditory and insular cortices. An ROI analysis revealed that global efficiency in the insula/auditory cortex was significantly greater in the Low MAAS group compared to the High MAAS group for BOOST® (P = 0.01) and NO BOOST® (p = 0.02) conditions.

It should read as follows:

Conversely, as shown in Figure 3, the low mindful group had greater clustering of globally efficient nodes in the auditory and insular cortices. However, an ROI analysis revealed that the average global efficiency in the insula/auditory cortex was significantly greater in the High MAAS group compared to the Low MAAS group for both the BOOST® (p = 0.01) and NO BOOST® (p = 0.02) conditions. Thus, while the high global efficiency nodes were more densely clustered in the insula/auditory cortex for the Low MAAS group (Figure 3), the average global efficiency of those nodes was on average lower than the High MAAS group (Table 2).

Conflict of Interest Statement

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Keywords: networks, mindfulness, food cues, obesity, aging, craving, self-efficacy

Citation: Paolini BM, Burdette JH, Laurienti PJ, Morgan A, Williamson DA and Rejeski WJ (2015) Corrigendum: Coping with brief periods of food restriction: mindfulness matters. Front. Aging Neurosci. 6:345. doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2014.00345

Received: 03 October 2014; Accepted: 17 December 2014;
Published online: 13 January 2015.

Edited by:

Gemma Casadesus, Case Western Reserve University, USA
Rodrigo O. Kuljiš, Zdrav Mozak Limitada, Chile

Reviewed by:

Gemma Casadesus, Case Western Reserve University, USA

Copyright © 2015 Paolini, Burdette, Laurienti, Morgan, Williamson and Rejeski. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: rejeski@wfu.edu