Research Topic

Reducing Susceptibility of Agroecosystems to Invasion through Sustainable Weed Management

About this Research Topic

The occurrence of invasive alien weeds in agroecosystems is largely attributed to its nutrient-rich status, regular irrigation and fertilizer application regime, disturbance, and monotonic vegetation pattern. Invasive species exhibit a profound negative impact on the agricultural yield’s quality and quantity thus causing the farmers huge economic loss. Once successfully established in the agricultural fields, they form persistent seed banks which ensures their reemergence in every growing season. In addition, climate change has further enhanced their invasive potential through the plasticity of traits and niche expansion in diverse ecosystems, including agricultural fields. They are capable of invading diverse agroecosystems by their ability to tolerate different biotic/abiotic stresses, massive propagule generation, and immense plasticity in traits, thus rendering the traditional management strategies ineffective. Understanding the invasion dynamics of invasive species and invasibility of agroecosystems can therefore help devise effective and species-specific management strategies.

Several exotic invasive weeds such as Ageratum conyzoides, Parthenium hysterophorus etc., have been reported to cause severe yield loss in crops and vegetables globally. Therefore, agricultural weed ecologists are now highlighting the concept of plant invasion before designing the weed control programs. Effective management approaches tend to include integrated techniques that can encapsulate understanding of weed behavior, and at the same time, the effectiveness, eco-friendly nature, and long-term consequences of control methods being employed. In addition to researching the presently persistent weeds, pre-preparedness is needed for identifying potential weed species which may pose harm in the near future. Identification of the most vulnerable habitats, most susceptible crop species, and the influences of climate change should also be a part of risk assessment programs. For achieving sustainable agriculture our ultimate goal should be the development of effective management plans that can keep a check on the spread and establishment of invasive weed species in addition to minimizing their impact on crop productivity, environment, and human/livestock health. The main goal of this Research Topic is to include articles that focus on the factors that make habitats less prone to invasion and enhances the competitiveness in crops to manage invasive species spread.

We invite original research papers, reviews, perspectives, methods, and opinions, etc. centering around the following specific topics, though not exclusively:

At habitat level
• Role of disturbance, resilience, and resistance
• Soil nutrient level/environment
• Soil Biota
• Changing climatic conditions
• Micro-climatic condition
• Species diversity
• Role of allelochemicals and herbicide residues

At species level
• Crop competitiveness / genetic diversity
• Agronomic/cultural practices
• Traits of invasive species
• Population ecology and genetics
• Role of allelopathy (crops as well as weeds)


Keywords: invasive weeds, weed traits, crop-weed interactions, allelopathy, habitat vulnerability


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The occurrence of invasive alien weeds in agroecosystems is largely attributed to its nutrient-rich status, regular irrigation and fertilizer application regime, disturbance, and monotonic vegetation pattern. Invasive species exhibit a profound negative impact on the agricultural yield’s quality and quantity thus causing the farmers huge economic loss. Once successfully established in the agricultural fields, they form persistent seed banks which ensures their reemergence in every growing season. In addition, climate change has further enhanced their invasive potential through the plasticity of traits and niche expansion in diverse ecosystems, including agricultural fields. They are capable of invading diverse agroecosystems by their ability to tolerate different biotic/abiotic stresses, massive propagule generation, and immense plasticity in traits, thus rendering the traditional management strategies ineffective. Understanding the invasion dynamics of invasive species and invasibility of agroecosystems can therefore help devise effective and species-specific management strategies.

Several exotic invasive weeds such as Ageratum conyzoides, Parthenium hysterophorus etc., have been reported to cause severe yield loss in crops and vegetables globally. Therefore, agricultural weed ecologists are now highlighting the concept of plant invasion before designing the weed control programs. Effective management approaches tend to include integrated techniques that can encapsulate understanding of weed behavior, and at the same time, the effectiveness, eco-friendly nature, and long-term consequences of control methods being employed. In addition to researching the presently persistent weeds, pre-preparedness is needed for identifying potential weed species which may pose harm in the near future. Identification of the most vulnerable habitats, most susceptible crop species, and the influences of climate change should also be a part of risk assessment programs. For achieving sustainable agriculture our ultimate goal should be the development of effective management plans that can keep a check on the spread and establishment of invasive weed species in addition to minimizing their impact on crop productivity, environment, and human/livestock health. The main goal of this Research Topic is to include articles that focus on the factors that make habitats less prone to invasion and enhances the competitiveness in crops to manage invasive species spread.

We invite original research papers, reviews, perspectives, methods, and opinions, etc. centering around the following specific topics, though not exclusively:

At habitat level
• Role of disturbance, resilience, and resistance
• Soil nutrient level/environment
• Soil Biota
• Changing climatic conditions
• Micro-climatic condition
• Species diversity
• Role of allelochemicals and herbicide residues

At species level
• Crop competitiveness / genetic diversity
• Agronomic/cultural practices
• Traits of invasive species
• Population ecology and genetics
• Role of allelopathy (crops as well as weeds)


Keywords: invasive weeds, weed traits, crop-weed interactions, allelopathy, habitat vulnerability


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

06 June 2021 Abstract
03 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

06 June 2021 Abstract
03 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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