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Front. Neurol. | doi: 10.3389/fneur.2019.00894

Transposable Elements, Inflammation and Neurological Disease

  • 1University of California, San Diego, United States

Transposable Elements (TE) are mobile DNA elements that can replicate and insert themselves into different locations within the host genome. Their propensity to self- propagate has a myriad of consequences and yet their biological significance is not well understood. Indeed, retrotransposons have evaded evolutionary attempts at repression and may contribute to somatic mosaicism. Retrotransposons are emerging as potent regulatory elements within the human genome. In the diseased state, there is mounting evidence that endogenous retroelements play a role in etiopathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, with a disposition for both autoimmune and neurological disorders. We postulate that active mobile genetic elements contribute more to human disease pathogenesis than previously thought..

Keywords: LINE-1, HERV, retrotransposition, CNS, Inflammation, Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

Received: 27 Apr 2019; Accepted: 02 Aug 2019.

Edited by:

Avindra Nath, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), United States

Reviewed by:

Hervé Perron, Independent researcher
Santiago Morell, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Carmen Salvador-Palomeque, Other, Australia  

Copyright: © 2019 Saleh, Macia Ortega and Muotri. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence: Prof. Alysson R. Muotri, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, 92093, California, United States, muotri@ucsd.edu