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Systematic Review ARTICLE Provisionally accepted The full-text will be published soon. Notify me

Front. Psychiatry | doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00797

Clinical effects of mindfulness-based intervention in patients with first episode psychosis and in individuals with ultra-high risk for transition to psychosis: a review

  • 1INSERM U1028 Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences de Lyon, France
  • 2CH le Vinatier, Lyon 1 university, INSERM U1028 Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences de Lyon, France

Objectives. Recent clinical studies and meta-analyses have reported the clinical effects of mindfulness-based interventions as a complementary treatment for patients with schizophrenia, but their possible efficacy in patients with first episode of psychosis (FEP) and in individuals with ultra-high risk (UHR) of transition to psychosis is less clear. Here, we investigated the current evidence on the usefulness of mindfulness-based interventions in these two populations.
Methods. We conducted a systematic search of the literature according to the PRISMA guidelines.
Results. Among the 102 references retrieved, 9 responded to the inclusion criteria (8 in FEP patients and one in UHR individuals). In FEP patients, mindfulness interventions are well-tolerated and have a satisfactory level of adherence. The clinical benefits consist primarily of reduced anxiety and sadness and improved quality of life. None of the studies reported any increase in positive symptoms.
Conclusion. Future sham-controlled studies with large sample sizes are needed to definitively conclude on the clinical interest of mindfulness-based interventions in FEP patients and UHR individuals as well as to understand their underlying mechanisms of action.

Keywords: mindfulness, MBSR/MBCT, First episode schizophrenia, UHR for psychosis, At risk population

Received: 05 Aug 2019; Accepted: 07 Oct 2019.

Copyright: © 2019 vignaud, Reilly, donde, Haesebaert and Brunelin. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence: Dr. Jerome Brunelin, INSERM U1028 Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences de Lyon, CH le Vinatier, Lyon 1 university, Bron, 69677, France, jerome.brunelin@ch-le-vinatier.fr