Research Topic

Cryospheric Remote Sensing

About this Research Topic

In the context of global warming, the cryosphere – glaciers, snow, and permafrost are changing significantly, presenting significant challenges to human lives and the environment. Studying the long-term historic and future characteristics, mechanisms, and consequences of changes in different components of the cryosphere is of great scientific value for understanding its evolution, interaction with other cirques, and response to climate change.

Ground-based cryosphere research is hindered by inaccessibility due to its harsh environment, topographic conditions, and logistic constraints. Remote sensing provides a viable option. Since the advent of satellite records, researchers have used these data to remotely investigate cryospheric changes and their related impacts. The launch of modern satellites and the availability of higher quality data provide a rich resource for cryosphere-related studies, whilst more novel methods and efficient algorithms provide more versatility in cryosphere-related studies. The availability of historic and latest datasets is a great boon to glaciologists, earth scientists, climate scientists, and geographers, owing to its wide applicability in the field of cryospheric science. Remote sensing serves as an effective and multifaceted tool to evaluate the past changes and regular monitoring of different components of the cryosphere, including ice caps, glaciers, snow cover, permafrost, glacial lakes, sea ice, river and lake ice. Further various remotely sensed datasets including optical, microwave, elevation models are widely used to study glacier-related hazards, contributions of ice melt to sea level rise, and glacier response to climate change. Moreover, the availability of remotely sensed climatic data aid improved attribution, predictions, and forecasting of climatic parameters and their potential impact on the cryosphere. This enables decision-makers and stakeholders to adopt sustainable approaches for the socio-economic benefit of society.

This Research Topic aims to collect and present the most recent research advances in regional or global scale cryosphere monitoring, its diverse components, and its potential impacts. This collection of new research will demonstrate the diverse applications of remotely sensed data and methods in the broad domain of cryospheric science, especially using some of the most recent and high-quality data that can be derived from active or passive satellite systems or a combination of both, or by combining the necessary field surveys and cross-disciplinary approaches. With these contributions, we wish to improve our understanding of the current Earth's cryospheric systems and provide insights into potential future research directions.

We welcome multiple forms of contributions, including original research papers, innovative methods, state-of-the-art reviews, and perspective articles. We are particularly interested in contributions that utilize the latest remote sensing data and techniques in an interdisciplinary nature. The authors can be individuals, independent research teams or international teams.


Keywords: cryosphere, ice sheets, ice caps, glaciers, snow cover, permafrost, glacial lakes, sea ice, lake and river ice, glacial hazards, climate change, remote sensing, numerical modelling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In the context of global warming, the cryosphere – glaciers, snow, and permafrost are changing significantly, presenting significant challenges to human lives and the environment. Studying the long-term historic and future characteristics, mechanisms, and consequences of changes in different components of the cryosphere is of great scientific value for understanding its evolution, interaction with other cirques, and response to climate change.

Ground-based cryosphere research is hindered by inaccessibility due to its harsh environment, topographic conditions, and logistic constraints. Remote sensing provides a viable option. Since the advent of satellite records, researchers have used these data to remotely investigate cryospheric changes and their related impacts. The launch of modern satellites and the availability of higher quality data provide a rich resource for cryosphere-related studies, whilst more novel methods and efficient algorithms provide more versatility in cryosphere-related studies. The availability of historic and latest datasets is a great boon to glaciologists, earth scientists, climate scientists, and geographers, owing to its wide applicability in the field of cryospheric science. Remote sensing serves as an effective and multifaceted tool to evaluate the past changes and regular monitoring of different components of the cryosphere, including ice caps, glaciers, snow cover, permafrost, glacial lakes, sea ice, river and lake ice. Further various remotely sensed datasets including optical, microwave, elevation models are widely used to study glacier-related hazards, contributions of ice melt to sea level rise, and glacier response to climate change. Moreover, the availability of remotely sensed climatic data aid improved attribution, predictions, and forecasting of climatic parameters and their potential impact on the cryosphere. This enables decision-makers and stakeholders to adopt sustainable approaches for the socio-economic benefit of society.

This Research Topic aims to collect and present the most recent research advances in regional or global scale cryosphere monitoring, its diverse components, and its potential impacts. This collection of new research will demonstrate the diverse applications of remotely sensed data and methods in the broad domain of cryospheric science, especially using some of the most recent and high-quality data that can be derived from active or passive satellite systems or a combination of both, or by combining the necessary field surveys and cross-disciplinary approaches. With these contributions, we wish to improve our understanding of the current Earth's cryospheric systems and provide insights into potential future research directions.

We welcome multiple forms of contributions, including original research papers, innovative methods, state-of-the-art reviews, and perspective articles. We are particularly interested in contributions that utilize the latest remote sensing data and techniques in an interdisciplinary nature. The authors can be individuals, independent research teams or international teams.


Keywords: cryosphere, ice sheets, ice caps, glaciers, snow cover, permafrost, glacial lakes, sea ice, lake and river ice, glacial hazards, climate change, remote sensing, numerical modelling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 December 2021 Abstract
17 May 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 December 2021 Abstract
17 May 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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