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Correction ARTICLE

Front. Endocrinol., 28 January 2019 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2019.00005

Corrigendum: Placental Nutrient Transport in Gestational Diabetic Pregnancies

Marisol Castillo-Castrejon1 and Theresa L. Powell1,2*
  • 1Division of Reproductive Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, United States
  • 2Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, United States

A Corrigendum on
Placental Nutrient Transport in Gestational Diabetic Pregnancies

by Castillo-Castrejon, M., and Powell, T. L. (2017). Front. Endocrinol. 8:306. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2017.00306

In the original article, there was an error. The term “placental MVM” was used instead of “placental BM.”

A correction has been made to the Introduction, Glucose Transport, Paragraph Number three:

“Pedersen's original hypothesis proposed that maternal hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes mellitus accelerates placental glucose transfer resulting in fetal hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which in turn stimulates fetal growth. However, macrosomia is also common in well-controlled diabetic pregnancies suggesting a change in placental function. Women with type 1 diabetes, with first trimester moderate hyperglycemia, showed higher expression of GLUT1 in the BM compared to healthy pregnancies (62). Likewise, a positive correlation has been reported between birth weight and GLUT1 density in the placental BM in type 1 diabetic pregnancies (82). Under in vitro conditions, hyperglycemia partially limits GLUT1 expression and its activity was inversely related to extracellular glucose in primary cultured human trophoblast from uncomplicated pregnancies (83). In addition, elevated glucose concentration promotes the translocation of the GLUT transporters from the cell surface to the intracellular compartment as a mechanism to downregulate glucose uptake (84) in cultured trophoblast cells. An interaction of insulin and glucose may be important in determining in vivo expression of placental GLUT isoforms.”

The authors apologize for this error and state that this does not change the scientific conclusions of the article in any way. The original article has been updated.

Keywords: obesity, gestational diabetes, placental transport, syncytiotrophoblast, fetal growth

Citation: Castillo-Castrejon M and Powell TL (2019) Corrigendum: Placental Nutrient Transport in Gestational Diabetic Pregnancies. Front. Endocrinol. 10:5. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2019.00005

Received: 29 November 2018; Accepted: 09 January 2019;
Published: 28 January 2019.

Edited and reviewed by: Hubert Vaudry, Université De Rouen, France

Copyright © 2019 Castillo-Castrejon and Powell. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Theresa L. Powell, theresa.powell@ucdenver.edu