Impact Factor 4.019

The world's most-cited Microbiology journal

Original Research ARTICLE Provisionally accepted The full-text will be published soon. Notify me

Front. Microbiol. | doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.02479

Plant Phenotypic Traits Eventually Shape Its Microbiota:A Common Garden Test

 Yunshi Li1, 2, 3, Xiukun Wu1, 4,  Tuo Chen1, 4, 5, Wanfu Wang1, 4, 6, Guangxiu Liu1, 4, Wei Zhang1, 4,  ShiWeng Li1,  Minghao Wang7,  Changming Zhao7, Huaizhe Zhou8 and  Gaosen Zhang1, 4*
  • 1Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Lanzhou Jiaotong University, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Lanzhou Jiaotong University, China
  • 3University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), China
  • 4Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Lanzhou Jiaotong University, China
  • 5Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources (CAS), China
  • 6Dunhuang Research Academy, China
  • 7State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystems, Lanzhou University, China
  • 8College of Computer, National University of Defence Technology, China

Plant genotype drives the development of plant phenotypes and the assembly of plant microbiota, but the potential influence of the plant phenotypic characters on its microbiota is not well characterized and the co-occurrence interrelations for specific microbial taxa and plant phenotypic characters are poorly understood. We established a common garden experiment, quantifying prokaryotic and fungal communities in the phyllosphere and rhizosphere of six spruce (Picea spp.) tree species, through Illumina amplicon sequencing. We tested for relationships between bacterial/archaeal and fungal communities and the phenotypic characters of their plant hosts. Host phenotypic characters including leaf length, leaf water content, leaf water storage capacity, leaf dry mass per area, leaf nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium contents, leaf δ13C values, stomatal conductance, net photosynthetic rate, intercellular carbon dioxide concentration, and transpiration rate were significantly correlated with the diversity and composition of the bacterial/archaeal and fungal communities. These correlations between plant microbiota and suites of host plant phenotypic characters suggest that plant genotype shape its microbiota by driving the development of plant phenotypes. This will advance our understanding of plant-microbe associations and the drivers of variation in plant and ecosystem function.

Keywords: plant microbiota, Host Specificity, Plant attributes, network analysis,, bacterial community, fungal community, phyllosphere, rhizosphere, spruce (Picea spp.) tree species

Received: 01 Jul 2018; Accepted: 28 Sep 2018.

Edited by:

Camille E. Granada, University of Taquari Valley, Brazil

Reviewed by:

Pedro Beschoren Da Costa, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil
Adriana Giongo, Universidade Regional de Blumenau, Brazil  

Copyright: © 2018 Li, Wu, Chen, Wang, Liu, Zhang, Li, Wang, Zhao, Zhou and Zhang. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence: Dr. Gaosen Zhang, Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Lanzhou Jiaotong University, Lanzhou, China, gaosenzhang@hotmail.com