EDITORIAL article

Front. Surg., 27 April 2022
Sec. Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
https://doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2022.913741

Editorial: Hydropic Ear Disease: Imaging and Functional Evaluation

  • Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan

Editorial on the Research Topic

Hydropic Ear Disease: Imaging and functional evaluation

Recent developments and advances in the objective methods of evaluating endolymphatic hydrops and its related inner ear diseases have led to a better understanding of inner ear disease. Twenty-one valuable articles have been published in this issue of the research topic “Hydropic Ear Disease: Imaging and functional evaluation” on the advances in diagnostic imaging and techniques for measuring the function of the six sensory organs present in the inner ear. As of the beginning of April 2022, it has already recorded more than 47,500 views, which means that readers are very interested in this project. Fifteen out of the 21 papers report on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patients.

MRI depiction of endolymphatic hydrops in the patients with Meniere’s disease was firstly achieved in 2007 with 3D-fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) obtained 24 h after intratympanic gadolinium contrast administration (1). A clinically feasible method using a heavily T2-weighted 3D-FLAIR after 4 hours of intravenous injection of a standard dose of gadolinium contrast agent was achieved in 2010 (2). After these developments, many technical improvements have been reported including the development of HYDROPS (HYbriD of Reversed image Of Positive endolymph signal and native image of positive perilymph Signal) technique, which utilized the subtraction of two kinds of images (3). After these developments, many institutions began to acquire the MR imaging of endolymphatic hydrops. Subsequently, an update of endolymphatic hydrops assessment using MR imaging has been proposed for the management of inner ear disease (47).

A number of attempts have been made to perform the assessment of endolymphatic hydrops by MRI without the use of gadolinium contrast media (812). However, these are unfortunately unreliable because they do not adequately distinguish between artifact and imaging findings (1315). Recognition of the endolymphatic space on non-contrast MRI is still possible only in very exceptional cases. These exceptional cases include hemorrhage into the ampulla (16), reflux of proteinous fluid in the enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac syndrome (17), and the compositional change of perilymph due to vestibular schwannomas (18). In general, contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops is the most reliable method of examination at this time.

In this research topic, Fukushima et al. have reported on the use of MRI of endolymphatic hydrops to observe the effect of positive pressure therapy in a Meniere's disease patient (https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fsurg.2021. 606100/full). Although this is a case report, this is a new and interesting proposal for the valuable and practical use of the MR imaging of endolymphatic hydrops.

In a review article of this research topic, that is co-authored by Topic editors, the authors tried to discuss and present a consensus on patient selection, imaging techniques, and evaluation methods at the occasion of 15 years after the invention of the MR imaging of the endolymphatic hydrops (https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fsurg.2022.874971/abstract).

It is expected that this issue of research topic will stimulate more interest in this field of research, encourage more researchers to enter the field, and ultimately help bring good news to patients suffering from the hydropics ear disease.

Author Contributions

The author wrote this manuscript and aproved it alone.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Publisher's Note

All claims expressed in this article are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of their affiliated organizations, or those of the publisher, the editors and the reviewers. Any product that may be evaluated in this article, or claim that may be made by its manufacturer, is not guaranteed or endorsed by the publisher.

References

1. Nakashima T, Naganawa S, Sugiura M, Teranishi M, Sone M, Hayashi H, et al. Visualization of endolymphatic hydrops in patients with Meniere’s disease. Laryngoscope. (2007) 117:415–20. doi: 10.1097/MLG.0b013e31802c300c

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

2. Naganawa S, Yamazaki M, Kawai H, Bokura K, Sone M, Nakashima T. Visualization of endolymphatic hydrops in Ménière’s disease with single-dose intravenous gadolinium-based contrast media using heavily T(2)-weighted 3D-FLAIR. Magn Reson Med Sci. (2010) 9:237–42. doi: 10.2463/mrms.9.237

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

3. Naganawa S, Yamazaki M, Kawai H, Bokura K, Sone M, Nakashima T. Imaging of Ménière’s disease after intravenous administration of single-dose gadodiamide: utility of subtraction images with different inversion time. Magn Reson Med Sci. (2012) 11:213–19. doi: 10.2463/mrms.11.213

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

4. Nakashima T, Pyykkö I, Arroll MA, Casselbrant ML, Foster CA, Manzoor NF, et al. Meniere’s disease. Nat Rev Dis Primers. (2016) 2:16028. doi: 10.1038/nrdp.2016.28

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

5. Gürkov R. Menière and friends: imaging and classification of hydropic ear disease. Otol Neurotol. (2017) 38:e539–e544. doi: 10.1097/MAO.0000000000001479

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

6. Iwasaki S, Shojaku H, Murofushi T, Seo T, Kitahara T, Origasa H, et al. Committee for clinical practice guidelines of Japan Society for equilibrium research. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for Meniere’s disease of the Japan Society for Equilibrium Research. Auris Nasus Larynx. (2021) 48:15–22. doi: 10.1016/j.anl.2020.10.009

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

7. Pyykkö I, Nakashima T, Yoshida T, Zou J, Naganawa S. Meniere’s disease: a reappraisal supported by a variable latency of symptoms and the MRI visualisation of endolymphatic hydrops. BMJ Open. (2013) 3(2):e001555. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001555

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

8. Fukutomi H, Hamitouche L, Yamamoto T, Denat L, Zhang L, Zhang B, et al. Visualization of the saccule and utricle with non-contrast-enhanced FLAIR sequences. Eur Radiol. (2021). doi: 10.1007/s00330-021-08403-w

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

9. Keller JH, Hirsch BE, Marovich RS, Branstetter BF 4th. Detection of endolymphatic hydrops using traditional MR imaging sequences. Am J Otolaryngol. (2017) 38:442–6. doi: 10.1016/j.amjoto.2017.01.038

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

10. Simon F, Guichard J-P, Kania R, Franc J, Herman P, Hautefort C. Saccular measurements in routine MRI can predict hydrops in Menière’s disease. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. (2017) 274:4113–20. doi: 10.1007/s00405-017-4756-8

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

11. van der Lubbe MFJA, Vaidyanathan A, de Wit M, van den Burg EL, Postma AA, Bruintjes TD, et al. A non-invasive, automated diagnosis of Menière’s disease using radiomics and machine learning on conventional magnetic resonance imaging: a multicentric, case-controlled feasibility study. Radiol Med. (2022) 127:72–82. doi: 10.1007/s11547-021-01425-w

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

12. Venkatasamy A, Veillon F, Fleury A, Eliezer M, Abu Eid M, Romain B, et al. Imaging of the saccule for the diagnosis of endolymphatic hydrops in Meniere disease, using a three-dimensional T2-weighted steady state free precession sequence: accurate, fast, and without contrast material intravenous injection. Eur Radiol Exp. (2017) 1(14). doi: 10.1186/s41747-017-0020-7

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

13. Naganawa S, Ito R, Taoka T, Yoshida T, Sone M. Letter to editor on the article “A non-invasive, automated diagnosis of Menière’s disease using radiomics and machine learning on conventional magnetic resonance imaging: a multicentric, case-controlled feasibility study” by van der Lubbe Mfja et al. Radiol Med. (2022). doi: 10.1007/s11547-022-01486-5

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

14. Naganawa S, Sone M. Letter to Editors: Detection of endolymphatic hydrops using traditional MR imaging sequences. Am J Otolaryngol. (2017) 38:637–8. doi: 10.1016/j.amjoto.2017.06.014

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

15. Dominguez P, Naganawa S. Letter to the editor on the article “Saccular measurements in routine MRI can predict hydrops in Ménière’s disease” by Simon F, et al. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. (2018) 275:311–12. doi: 10.1007/s00405-017-4794-2

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

16. Naganawa S, Ishihara S, Iwano S, Sone M, Nakashima T. Detection of presumed hemorrhage in the ampullar endolymph of the semicircular canal: a case report. Magn Reson Med Sci. (2009) 8:187–91. doi: 10.2463/mrms.8.187

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

17. Naganawa S, Sone M, Otake H, Nakashima T. Endolymphatic hydrops of the labyrinth visualized on noncontrast MR imaging: a case report. Magn Reson Med Sci. (2009) 8:43–6. doi: 10.2463/mrms.8.43

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

18. Yamazaki M, Naganawa S, Kawai H, Nihashi T, Fukatsu H, Nakashima T. Increased signal intensity of the cochlea on pre- and post-contrast enhanced 3D-FLAIR in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Neuroradiology. (2009) 51:855–63. doi: 10.1007/s00234-009-0588-6

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Meniere's disease, Endolymphatic hydrops-related disease, Gadolilnium, Hydropic ear disease

Citation: Naganawa S (2022) Editorial: Hydropic Ear Disease: Imaging and Functional Evaluation. Front. Surg. 9:913741. doi: 10.3389/fsurg.2022.913741

Received: 6 April 2022; Accepted: 8 April 2022;
Published: 27 April 2022.

Edited by:

Pavel Dulguerov, Geneva University Hospitals (HUG), Switzerland

*Correspondence: Shinji Naganawa naganawa@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Speciality section: This article was submitted to Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, a section of the journal Frontiers in Surgery

Copyright © 2022 Naganawa. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

Download