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Correction ARTICLE

Front. Oncol., 31 January 2019 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2018.00672

Corrigendum: Metabolic Dependencies in Pancreatic Cancer

Ali Vaziri-Gohar1, Mahsa Zarei2,3, Jonathan R. Brody4 and Jordan M. Winter1,5*
  • 1School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States
  • 2Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States
  • 3Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States
  • 4Division of Surgical Research, Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, United States
  • 5Department of Surgery and Division of Surgical Oncology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, United States

A Corrigendum on
Metabolic Dependencies in Pancreatic Cancer

by Vaziri-Gohar, A., Zarei, M., Brody, J. R., and Winter, J. M. (2018). Front. Oncol. 8:617. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2018.00617

In the original article, all references for in Tables 1, 2 were incorrectly listed. The corrected references for both Table 1 and Table 2 have been corrected and provided below.

TABLE 1
www.frontiersin.org

Table 1. Metabolic dependencies in PDA.

TABLE 2
www.frontiersin.org

Table 2. Clinical trials targeting key steps of PDA metabolism.

In the original article, references in Table 2 were not provided in the reference list. The references have now been inserted.

The authors apologize for these errors and state that they do not change the scientific conclusions of the article in any way. The original article has been updated.

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Keywords: pancreatic cancer, metabolism, redox homeostasis, metabolic dependencies, targeting metabolism

Citation: Vaziri-Gohar A, Zarei M, Brody JR and Winter JM (2019) Corrigendum: Metabolic Dependencies in Pancreatic Cancer. Front. Oncol. 8:672. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2018.00672

Received: 19 December 2018; Accepted: 20 December 2018;
Published: 31 January 2019.

Approved by: Frontiers in Oncology Editorial Office, Frontiers Media SA, Switzerland

Copyright © 2019 Vaziri-Gohar, Zarei, Brody and Winter. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Jordan M. Winter, jordan.winter@UHhospitals.org