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Published on 08 Apr 2024

Pig hearts kept alive outside the body for more than 24 hours offers hope for many humans needing a transplant

A major bottleneck on human heart transplantation are limits to storage of the donor heart outside the body, which is currently only routinely possible for six hours. Scientists have now tested new preservation methods, to keep pig hearts routinely alive outside the body for at least 24 hours. If successfully extended to humans, this would constitute a significant improvement to clinical practice.

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Published on 10 Apr 2024

Kaveri Mayra - Unmasking the hidden violence around pregnancy and birth in obstetric settings

Dr Kaveri Mayra is a global health researcher with qualifications in midwifery, nursing, and public health. Her work focuses on understanding determinants of positive and negative perinatal care experiences. At the University of British Columbia, she leads the Continuum for Respectful Care (CORE) initiative and plays a key role in bringing out the qualitative narratives from the RESPCCT initiative through innovative arts-based research methods. In 2020, Kaveri was recognized as one of the 100 outstanding global midwife and nurse leaders by Women in Global Health (WGH) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Kaveri and I discuss her experience as a young nurse-midwife, the problems facing obstetric and maternity care, as well as some unexpected potential solutions. Currently, Kaveri is leading a Research Topic titled: Prioritizing Pleasure in Reproductive and Maternal Health to Address Obstetric Violence in Frontiers in Global Women’s Health.

Featured news

Published on 08 Apr 2024

Pig hearts kept alive outside the body for more than 24 hours offers hope for many humans needing a transplant

A major bottleneck on human heart transplantation are limits to storage of the donor heart outside the body, which is currently only routinely possible for six hours. Scientists have now tested new preservation methods, to keep pig hearts routinely alive outside the body for at least 24 hours. If successfully extended to humans, this would constitute a significant improvement to clinical practice.

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Published on 27 Mar 2024

Scientists discover how caterpillars can stop their bleeding in seconds

Materials scientists have now shown how the blood-like hemolymph of tobacco hornworm caterpillars forms clots to stop bleeding. They show that outside the body, hemolymph can instantaneously change from water-like behavior to become ‘viscoelastic’ like saliva, that is, combining viscosity with elasticity. This discovery could have medical applications, if drugs can be designed that induce a similar change in human blood, to make it clot faster.

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