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Published on 26 Feb 2024

How did a tiny bee get to French Polynesia? Eight new species help solve a scientific mystery

Scientists discovered eight new species of masked bee in Fiji, Micronesia, and Polynesia: relatives of Tuamotu’s masked bee from Tuamotu. For 59 years, this bee had been considered by experts to be a mysterious anomaly since its closest relatives, as far as was known at the time, lived 3,000 km further west. With the new species, discovered by sampling from the tree canopy, the mystery is solved: ancestors of Tuamotu’s masked bee reached Polynesia by island-hopping across Fiji and the southwestern Pacific. Many more new species are expected to be discovered in the canopy of islands along this route soon.

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Published on 26 Feb 2024

How did a tiny bee get to French Polynesia? Eight new species help solve a scientific mystery

Scientists discovered eight new species of masked bee in Fiji, Micronesia, and Polynesia: relatives of Tuamotu’s masked bee from Tuamotu. For 59 years, this bee had been considered by experts to be a mysterious anomaly since its closest relatives, as far as was known at the time, lived 3,000 km further west. With the new species, discovered by sampling from the tree canopy, the mystery is solved: ancestors of Tuamotu’s masked bee reached Polynesia by island-hopping across Fiji and the southwestern Pacific. Many more new species are expected to be discovered in the canopy of islands along this route soon.

Frontiers news

Published on 16 Feb 2024

Frontiers statement concerning the article "Cellular functions of spermatogonial stem cells in relation to JAK/STAT signaling pathway", published on 13 February 2024

Thanks to the crowdsourcing dynamic of open science, we promptly acted upon the community feedback on the AI-generated figures in the article "Cellular functions of spermatogonial stem cells in relation to JAK/STAT signaling pathway", published on 13 February 2024. Frontiers has now retracted and removed the article from the databases to protect the integrity of the scientific record.

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Published on 14 Feb 2024

Tiny crustaceans discovered preying on live jellyfish during harsh Arctic night

Scientists used DNA metabarcoding to show for the first time that jellyfish are an important food for amphipods during the Arctic polar night in waters off Svalbard, at a time of year when other food resources are scarce. Amphipods were not only observed to feast on ‘jelly-falls’ of dead jellyfish, but also to prey on live jellyfish. These results corroborate an ongoing ‘paradigm shift’ which recognizes that jellyfish aren’t a trophic dead-end but an important food for many marine organisms.

Frontiers news

Published on 12 Feb 2024

Gabby Ahmadia - Cutting the strings to parachute science

Dr Gabby Ahmadia is vice president of Area-Based Conservation for the Oceans program at WWF-US, where she oversees science teams working together in priority regions around the globe, from the Pacific to Indian Ocean. We talk about the importance of strong international collaboration and addressing power dynamics to overcome the pervasive practice of parachute science, while also tackling issues of being a woman in science.

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