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Front. Psychol. | doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00233

Active construction of profession-related events: The priming effect among pre-service teachers with different professional identity

 Xin Q. Wang1*,  Juncheng Zhu1*, Lu Liu1, Xiang y. Chen1 and Jun y. Huo1
  • 1School of Psychology, Jiangxi Normal University, China

Pre-service teachers with different professional identity may actively construct different subjective profession-related events based on the same objective profession-related events. To explore the priming effect among pre-service teachers with different professional identity, this study examined the effect of positive, negative, or neutral priming sentences in an individualized narration of profession-related events through a priming paradigm. Forty-two female volunteers were asked to complete positive, negative, and neutral priming sentences describing profession-related events. The results showed that, relative to those with weak professional identity, participants with strong professional identity generated a higher number of positive items when primed with different stimuli and displayed greater positive priming bias for positive and neutral stimuli. In addition, relative to those with strong professional identity, participants with weak professional identity generated a higher number of neutral and negative items when primed with positive and negative stimuli, respectively, and displayed greater negative priming bias towards negative stimuli. These results indicate that pre-service teachers with strong professional identity were likely to have established positive self-schemas involving profession-related events, which facilitated active, positive construction of such events.

Keywords: pre-service teacher, teacher professional identity, profession-related event, active construction, priming effect, Self-schema

Received: 10 Oct 2017; Accepted: 12 Feb 2018.

Edited by:

Michael S. Dempsey, Boston University, United States

Reviewed by:

Silvia R. Ouakinin, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
Yangu Pan, Southwestern University of Finance and Economics, China  

Copyright: © 2018 Wang, Zhu, Liu, Chen and Huo. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
Dr. Xin Q. Wang, Jiangxi Normal University, School of Psychology, No 99, Ziyang Road, Nanchang, Jiangxi province, 330022, China, Nanchang, 330022, Jiangxi province, China, xinqiangw101@163.com
Mr. Juncheng Zhu, Jiangxi Normal University, School of Psychology, No 99, Ziyang Road, Nanchang, Jiangxi province, 330022, China, Nanchang, 330022, Jiangxi province, China, zhujcpsy@126.com