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Catch a Liar: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

Original Research ARTICLE Provisionally accepted The full-text will be published soon. Notify me

Front. Psychol. | doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02268

Are proselfs more deceptive and hypocritical? Social image concerns in appearing fair

 Honghong Tang1,  Shun Wang2, Zilu Liang2, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong3,  Song Su4* and  Chao Liu2*
  • 1State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, China
  • 2State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, China
  • 3Kenan Institute for Ethics, Duke University, United States
  • 4School of Economics and Business Administration, Beijing Normal University, China

Deception varies across individuals and social contexts. The present research explored how individual difference measured by social value orientations, and situations, affect deception in moral hypocrisy. In two experiments, participants made allocations between themselves and recipients with an opportunity to deceive recipients where recipients cannot reject their allocations. Experiment 1 demonstrated that proselfs were more deceptive and hypocritical than prosocials by lying to be apparently fair, especially when deception was unrevealed. Experiment 2 showed that proselfs were more concerned about social image in deception in moral hypocrisy than prosocials were. They decreased apparent fairness when deception was revealed and evaluated by a third-party reviewer and increased it when deception was evaluated but unrevealed. These results show that prosocials and proselfs differed in pursuing deception and moral hypocrisy social goals and provide implications for decreasing deception and moral hypocrisy.

Keywords: Social value orientations, social image concerns, deception, moral hypocrisy, hypocritical fairness

Received: 25 Sep 2018; Accepted: 31 Oct 2018.

Edited by:

Xunbing Shen, Department of Psychology, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China

Reviewed by:

Xiaochu Zhang, University of Science and Technology of China, China
Fang Cui, Shenzhen University, China  

Copyright: © 2018 Tang, Wang, Liang, Sinnott-Armstrong, Su and Liu. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
Dr. Song Su, School of Economics and Business Administration, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China, sus@bnu.edu.cn
Prof. Chao Liu, State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China, liuchao@bnu.edu.cn